Carrie Johnson Carrie Johnson is NPR's National Justice Correspondent.
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Carrie Johnson

Flowers, candles and mementoes are left at a makeshift memorial outside the Tops market on May 18, 2022 in Buffalo, New York. Police say the shooting that killed 10 and wounded three is being investigated as a racially motivated hate crime. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

U.S. District Chief Judge Debra M. Brown, left, jokes with District Judge Carlton Reeves for the Southern District of Mississippi, right, his law clerk George Brewster, second from left, and student James Minor, following a "gavel passing ceremony" in Greenville, Miss., Friday, June 11, 2021. Rogelio V. Solis/AP hide caption

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Rogelio V. Solis/AP

Former Michigan State University and USA Gymnastics doctor Larry Nassar appears in court for his final sentencing phase in Eaton County Circuit Court on February 5, 2018 in Charlotte, Michigan. RENA LAVERTY/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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RENA LAVERTY/AFP via Getty Images

A truck is used to patrol the grounds of the Federal Correctional Complex Terre Haute on July 25, 2019 in Terre Haute, Indiana. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Justice Department works to curb racial bias in deciding who's released from prison

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A view of The Crossing apartment building in Washington, D.C.'s Navy Yard neighborhood on April 8. The building, which was raided by the FBI on April 6, is the home of two men accused of posing as federal law enforcement employees and ingratiating themselves with U.S. Secret Service agents. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

A great egret stands near former President Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago resort on Feb. 11, as reports emerged that the National Archives had recovered documents from Trump's Palm Beach, Fla., home. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

U.S. Attorney General Merrick Garland speaks during a press conference at the U.S. Justice Department on April 06, 2022 in Washington, DC. He tested positive for COVID-19 within hours of making remarks. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

A marathon day is ahead for Supreme Court nominee Ketanji Brown Jackson

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In this Aug. 26, 2020, file photo, the federal prison complex in Terre Haute, Ind. Michael Conroy/AP hide caption

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Michael Conroy/AP

Senior citizens serving federal sentences have fallen through the cracks

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Flanked by US Deputy Attorney General Lisa Monaco (L) and Associate Attorney General Vanita Gupta, Attorney General Merrick Garland convenes a Justice Department component heads meeting at the Justice Department on March 10. Garland was prompted by an NPR story on compassionate release waivers to fix the issue. KEVIN LAMARQUE/POOL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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KEVIN LAMARQUE/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

What AG Merrick Garland told NPR about the Jan. 6 probe and death penalty

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Garland said protecting civil rights is one of his three priorities and the FBI and Justice Department are "all-in" on that effort. Eman Mohammed for NPR hide caption

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Eman Mohammed for NPR

Garland says the Jan. 6 investigation won't end until everyone is held accountable

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Jan. 6 Capitol riot defendant Guy Reffitt has been found guilty on all counts

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