Carrie Johnson Carrie Johnson is a Justice Correspondent for the Washington Desk.
Linda Fittante/NPR
Carrie Johnson 2016
Linda Fittante/NPR

Carrie Johnson

Justice Correspondent

Carrie Johnson is a Justice Correspondent for the Washington Desk.

She covers a wide variety of stories about justice issues, law enforcement and legal affairs for NPR's flagship programs Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as the Newscasts and NPR.org.

While in this role, Johnson has chronicled major challenges to the landmark voting rights law, a botched law enforcement operation targeting gun traffickers along the Southwest border, and the Obama administration's deadly drone program for suspected terrorists overseas.

Prior to coming to NPR in 2010, Johnson worked at the Washington Post for 10 years, where she closely observed the FBI, the Justice Department and criminal trials of the former leaders of Enron, HealthSouth and Tyco. Earlier in her career, she wrote about courts for the weekly publication Legal Times.

Outside of her role at NPR, Johnson regularly moderates or appears on legal panels for the American Bar Association, the American Constitution Society, the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers, and others. She's talked about her work on CNN, MSNBC, Fox News, PBS, and other outlets.

Her work has been honored with awards from the Society for Professional Journalists and the Society of American Business Editors and Writers. She has been a finalist for the Loeb award for financial journalism and for the Pulitzer Prize in breaking news for team coverage of the massacre at Fort Hood, Texas.

Johnson is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Benedictine University in Illinois.

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Story Archive

Brett Talley stands in Holy Rood Cemetery in Washington, D.C., in 2014. Talley had been rated "unanimously unqualified" for a lifetime judicial appointment and his nomination "will not be moving forward," according to a Trump administration official. Matt McClain/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Matt McClain/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Christopher Wray testifies during his confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee on July 12, 2017, in Washington, D.C. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Trump's Tweet About Flynn Lying To FBI Raises Questions

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The formal printed 2016 Republican platform is placed on the chairs of the state delegates on the floor of the Republican National Convention on July 18, 2016, in Cleveland. One part of the platform that changed was about U.S. assistance to Ukraine. Jeff Swensen/Getty Images hide caption

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Department of Justice special counsel Robert Mueller leaves after a closed meeting with members of the Senate Judiciary Committee in June at the Capitol in Washington, D.C. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Flynn Expected To Plead Guilty To Charge He Made False Statements To FBI

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Michael Flynn, former national security adviser to President Trump, arrives for his plea hearing at the Prettyman Federal Courthouse on Friday in Washington, D.C. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Michael Flynn Pleads Guilty To Lying To FBI

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Democrats Lack Votes To Block Trump's Federal Judge Nominees

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Attorney General Jeff Sessions is testifying before the House Judiciary Committee on Tuesday and is expected to get questions about his oversight of the Justice Department and Trump campaign contacts with Russia in 2016. Jason Connolly/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jason Connolly/AFP/Getty Images

For Attorney General Sessions, Hill Testimony Presents Risk And Opportunity

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Former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn's Ties To The Special Counsel Investigation

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Lawmakers Advanced 5 Of Trump's Nominees For Lifetime Appointments As Federal Judges

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A photo posted in March, 2016 on President Donald Trump's Twitter account shows George Papadopoulos, third from left, at a national security meeting with then-candidate Donald Trump. The President told reporters on Friday morning that "I don't remember much" about the controversial meeting. Donald Trump's Twitter account/AP hide caption

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Donald Trump's Twitter account/AP