Carrie Johnson Carrie Johnson is a Justice Correspondent for the Washington Desk.
Linda Fittante/NPR
Carrie Johnson 2016
Linda Fittante/NPR

Carrie Johnson

Justice Correspondent

Carrie Johnson is a Justice Correspondent for the Washington Desk.

She covers a wide variety of stories about justice issues, law enforcement and legal affairs for NPR's flagship programs Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as the Newscasts and NPR.org.

While in this role, Johnson has chronicled major challenges to the landmark voting rights law, a botched law enforcement operation targeting gun traffickers along the Southwest border, and the Obama administration's deadly drone program for suspected terrorists overseas.

Prior to coming to NPR in 2010, Johnson worked at the Washington Post for 10 years, where she closely observed the FBI, the Justice Department and criminal trials of the former leaders of Enron, HealthSouth and Tyco. Earlier in her career, she wrote about courts for the weekly publication Legal Times.

Outside of her role at NPR, Johnson regularly moderates or appears on legal panels for the American Bar Association, the American Constitution Society, the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers, and others. She's talked about her work on CNN, MSNBC, Fox News, PBS, and other outlets.

Her work has been honored with awards from the Society for Professional Journalists and the Society of American Business Editors and Writers. She has been a finalist for the Loeb award for financial journalism and for the Pulitzer Prize in breaking news for team coverage of the massacre at Fort Hood, Texas.

Johnson is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Benedictine University in Illinois.

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Story Archive

The office of Justice Department special counsel Robert Mueller says 13 Russians and three Russian entities took part in a broad information war against the United States. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Grand Jury Indicts Russians Linked To Interference In 2016 Election

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Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing last December. Grassley had stinging words Thursday for Attorney General Jeff Sessions, who opposes a birpartisan bill that would reduce some mandatory minimum drug sentences. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Director Of National Intelligence Says 2018 Midterms Are Potential Target For Russian Influence

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Why Trump Blocked The Democrats' Memo

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Rachel Brand, Third In Command At The Justice Department, Is Leaving Her Post

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Associate Attorney General Rachel Brand speaks during the opening of the summit on Efforts to Combat Human Trafficking on Feb. 2 at the Justice Department. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

Attorney General Jeff Sessions (left) speaks while Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein listens during a summit at the Justice Department on Feb. 2 in Washington, D.C., to discuss efforts to combat human trafficking. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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In His First Year As Attorney General, Sessions Transforms Justice In Key Ways

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Unpacking The Reaction To Plans To Release The Nunes Memo

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FBI Prepares For Release Of Controversial Memo

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News Brief: Nunes Memo, Nuclear Posture Review, Olympic Doping

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Deputy AG Rod Rosenstein Under Pressure As Republicans Prepare To Release Memo

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FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe was expected to retire in early 2018 after he hit a time-in-service milestone and could begin collecting his pension. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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How Reports Of Trump Trying To Fire Mueller Could Affect The Russia Investigation

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Missing FBI Text Messages Exemplify Animosity Between Organization And GOP

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