Carrie Johnson Carrie Johnson is a justice correspondent for the Washington Desk.
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Carrie Johnson

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Carrie Johnson 2016
Linda Fittante/NPR

Carrie Johnson

Justice Correspondent

Carrie Johnson is a justice correspondent for the Washington Desk.

She covers a wide variety of stories about justice issues, law enforcement, and legal affairs for NPR's flagship programs Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as the newscasts and NPR.org.

Johnson has chronicled major challenges to the landmark voting rights law, a botched law enforcement operation targeting gun traffickers along the Southwest border, and the Obama administration's deadly drone program for suspected terrorists overseas.

Prior to coming to NPR in 2010, Johnson worked at the Washington Post for 10 years, where she closely observed the FBI, the Justice Department, and criminal trials of the former leaders of Enron, HealthSouth, and Tyco. Earlier in her career, she wrote about courts for the weekly publication Legal Times.

Her work has been honored with awards from the Robert F. Kennedy Center for Justice and Human Rights, the Society for Professional Journalists, SABEW, and the National Juvenile Defender Center. She has been a finalist for the Loeb Award for financial journalism and for the Pulitzer Prize in breaking news for team coverage of the massacre at Fort Hood, Texas.

Johnson is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Benedictine University in Illinois.

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Story Archive

Michael Flynn, President Donald Trump's former national security adviser, leaves federal court with lawyer Sidney Powell, left on Tuesday, Sept. 10, 2019. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

Amy Coney Barrett Nominated And Expected To Be Confirmed To Supreme Court

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Trump To Nominate New Supreme Court Justice As Nation Mourns Ruth Bader Ginsburg

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Trump May Appoint Federal Judge Amy Coney Barrett To The Supreme Court

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Judge Amy Coney Barrett, pictured in 2018, is 48 years old and would likely serve for decades to come on the high court if confirmed by the Senate. Rachel Malehorn/rachelmalehorn.smugmug.com via AP hide caption

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Rachel Malehorn/rachelmalehorn.smugmug.com via AP

This May 26 photo shows an official Democratic primary mail-in ballot and secrecy envelope for the Pennsylvania primary in Pittsburgh. Gene J. Puskar/AP hide caption

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Gene J. Puskar/AP

Demonstrators gathered across from the federal prison complex in Terre Haute, Ind., to protest the death penalty. Another execution is scheduled for Thursday. Michael Conroy/AP hide caption

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Michael Conroy/AP

How A Perpetrator's Race And Age Factor Into Who Is Executed

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President Trump Could Announce His Supreme Court Nominee Within The Week

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The flag flies at half-staff Saturday at the Supreme Court on the morning after the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

President Trump shakes hands with Neil Gorsuch, his first pick for a spot on the U.S. Supreme Court, on Jan. 31, 2017. The president will likely have the opportunity to name a replacement for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who died Friday. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

A federal judge has recommended the Justice Department look into the handling of an Iran sanctions case. "With each misstep, the public faith in the criminal justice system further erodes." J. David Ake/AP hide caption

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J. David Ake/AP

Barr Criticizes Prosecutors, Makes Incendiary Comments On Slavery And Pandemic

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U.S. Attorney General William Barr, seen here in Phoenix on Sept. 10, called his colleagues at the Justice Department a "permanent bureaucracy" in a speech Wednesday. Bob Christie/AP hide caption

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Bob Christie/AP