Carrie Johnson Carrie Johnson is NPR's National Justice Correspondent.
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Carrie Johnson

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Carrie Johnson 2016
Linda Fittante/NPR

Carrie Johnson

Justice Correspondent

Carrie Johnson is NPR's National Justice Correspondent.

She covers a wide variety of stories about justice issues, law enforcement, and legal affairs for NPR's flagship programs Morning Edition and All Things Considered. Johnson regularly appears on the NPR Politics Podcast.

Prior to coming to NPR in 2010, Johnson worked at the Washington Post for 10 years. Earlier in her career, she wrote about courts for the weekly publication Legal Times.

Her work has been honored with awards from the Robert F. Kennedy Center for Justice and Human Rights, the Society for Professional Journalists, and SABEW. She served as a fellow at the Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard University from 2019-2020. In 2021, the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers honored Johnson with a rarely-bestowed Champion of Justice award for her journalism work.

She has been a finalist for the Loeb Award for financial journalism and for the Pulitzer Prize in breaking news for team coverage of the massacre at Fort Hood, Texas.

Johnson is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Benedictine University in Illinois. She sits on the advisory board for the Center for Journalism Ethics at UW-M and the Historical Society of the D.C. Circuit.

Story Archive

Tuesday

The U.S. Supreme Court on October 4, 2023. Catie Dull/NPR hide caption

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Catie Dull/NPR

Monday

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Judge in Trump's classified documents case draws scrutiny

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Friday

U.S. Army soldiers wear boots as they march in formation during a change of command ceremony, Monday, April 3, 2017, at Joint Base Lewis-McChord in Washington state. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

Thursday

National Guard members take a staircase toward the U.S. Capitol building before a rehearsal for President-elect Joe Biden's Inauguration in Washington on Jan. 18, 2021. Experts in constitutional law and the military say the Insurrection Act gives presidents tremendous power with few restraints. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Wednesday

Legal experts are calling for reforms to the insurrection act

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Tuesday

Former President Donald Trump awaits the start of a pre-trial hearing with his defense team at Manhattan criminal, Monday, March 25, 2024, in New York. Mary Altaffer/AP hide caption

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Mary Altaffer/AP

Friday

Looking into the fallout surrounding Fani Willis

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Monday

The U.S Supreme Court is photographed on Friday, Jan. 5, 2024, in Washington. Mariam Zuhaib/AP hide caption

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Mariam Zuhaib/AP

Trump To Appear On All Primary Ballots

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Thursday

Republican presidential candidate former President Donald Trump pumps his fist as he departs after speaking during the Conservative Political Action Conference, CPAC 2024, in Oxon Hill, Md., Feb. 24, 2024. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Wednesday

The Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., on Feb. 14. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

Supreme Court to hear arguments in Trump immunity case in April

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Tuesday

The opening page of X is displayed on a computer and phone in Sydney, on Oct. 16, 2023. Rick Rycroft/AP hide caption

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Rick Rycroft/AP

Monday

The U.S. Supreme Court Catie Dull/NPR hide caption

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Catie Dull/NPR

Supreme Court justices appear skeptical of Texas and Florida social media laws

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The Supreme Court to hear a case that could help define the future of the internet

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Wednesday

Supreme Court hears arguments in important case about ozone pollution rule

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EPA rule that limits pollution is being challenged in the Supreme Court

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The U.S. Supreme Court will hear a challenge from GOP-led states and industry groups seeking to block the EPA's "good neighbor" provision, which is designed to reduce smog and air pollution. Catie Dull/NPR hide caption

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Catie Dull/NPR

Monday

Friday

Appeals court rules Trump doesn't have immunity in 2020 criminal election case

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Thursday

Supreme Court hears arguments over whether Trump qualifies to run for president

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A U.S. Supreme Court police officer stands in fron of the U.S. Supreme Court Wednesday, Feb. 7, 2024, in Washington. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

A banner is displayed in front of the U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday as justices prepared to hear arguments in a case about whether former President Donald Trump can be disqualified from state ballots. The case has profound implications for the 2024 presidential election. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

Listen to special coverage of the arguments

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