Carrie Johnson Carrie Johnson is a justice correspondent for the Washington Desk.
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Carrie Johnson

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Carrie Johnson 2016
Linda Fittante/NPR

Carrie Johnson

Justice Correspondent

Carrie Johnson is a justice correspondent for the Washington Desk.

She covers a wide variety of stories about justice issues, law enforcement, and legal affairs for NPR's flagship programs Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as the newscasts and NPR.org.

Johnson has chronicled major challenges to the landmark voting rights law, a botched law enforcement operation targeting gun traffickers along the Southwest border, and the Obama administration's deadly drone program for suspected terrorists overseas.

Prior to coming to NPR in 2010, Johnson worked at the Washington Post for 10 years, where she closely observed the FBI, the Justice Department, and criminal trials of the former leaders of Enron, HealthSouth, and Tyco. Earlier in her career, she wrote about courts for the weekly publication Legal Times.

Her work has been honored with awards from the Robert F. Kennedy Center for Justice and Human Rights, the Society for Professional Journalists, SABEW, and the National Juvenile Defender Center. She has been a finalist for the Loeb Award for financial journalism and for the Pulitzer Prize in breaking news for team coverage of the massacre at Fort Hood, Texas.

Johnson is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Benedictine University in Illinois.

Story Archive

Steve Bannon, Former Top Trump Aide, Charged With Contempt Of Congress

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Steve Bannon, once chief strategist to then-President Donald Trump, has been charged by the Justice Department with criminal contempt of Congress. Here, he is pictured in August 2018. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

The Justice Department has charged 2 hackers for major ransomware attacks

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Russian Yevgeniy Polyanin is one of two men indicted by the U.S. in connection with ransomware attacks last summer. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

U.S. indicts 2 men behind major ransomware attacks

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Federal watchdogs want more power to investigate wrongdoing within the government

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The Supreme Court will hear a gun-rights case dealing with the Second Amendment

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Robert Davis' experience exiting parole has been a difficult process. He seemed to be doing everything correctly, but a miscommunication between the U.S. Parole Commission and his parole officers delayed his release from supervision. Nate Palmer for NPR hide caption

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Nate Palmer for NPR

After prison he followed the rules, but a parole mishap delayed his full freedom

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Tablets believed to be laced with fentanyl are displayed at a Drug Enforcement Administration lab in New York in 2019. The Biden administration is hoping to crack down on abuse of synthetic opioids in part by putting them in the most restricted category or "schedule" under the law. Don Emmert/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Don Emmert/AFP via Getty Images

A proposed Biden drug policy could widen racial disparities, civil rights groups warn

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Attorney General Merrick Garland told the House Judiciary Committee that "the Department of Justice has a long-standing policy of not commenting on investigations." Greg Nash/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Greg Nash/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Andrew McCabe, shown here in 2017, was fired in 2018 by the Trump administration hours before his retirement. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Fired FBI official Andrew McCabe wins retirement benefits and back pay in settlement

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Enforcement of the new abortion law in Texas is blocked by a federal judge

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DOJ will revisit decision not to charge FBI agents in failed Nassar case

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United States gymnasts Kaylee Lorincz and Simone Biles hug after a Senate Judiciary hearing about the Inspector General's report on the FBI's handling of the Larry Nassar investigation on Sept. 15, 2021. Saul Loeb/Pool/AP hide caption

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Saul Loeb/Pool/AP

Abortion-rights supporters march outside the Texas Capitol in Austin on Sept. 1. Sergio Flores/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Sergio Flores/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Texas' abortion law is back in court

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