Carrie Johnson Carrie Johnson is a justice correspondent for the Washington Desk.
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Carrie Johnson

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Carrie Johnson 2016
Linda Fittante/NPR

Carrie Johnson

Justice Correspondent

Carrie Johnson is a justice correspondent for the Washington Desk.

She covers a wide variety of stories about justice issues, law enforcement, and legal affairs for NPR's flagship programs Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as the newscasts and NPR.org.

Johnson has chronicled major challenges to the landmark voting rights law, a botched law enforcement operation targeting gun traffickers along the Southwest border, and the Obama administration's deadly drone program for suspected terrorists overseas.

Prior to coming to NPR in 2010, Johnson worked at the Washington Post for 10 years, where she closely observed the FBI, the Justice Department, and criminal trials of the former leaders of Enron, HealthSouth, and Tyco. Earlier in her career, she wrote about courts for the weekly publication Legal Times.

Her work has been honored with awards from the Robert F. Kennedy Center for Justice and Human Rights, the Society for Professional Journalists, SABEW, and the National Juvenile Defender Center. She has been a finalist for the Loeb Award for financial journalism and for the Pulitzer Prize in breaking news for team coverage of the massacre at Fort Hood, Texas.

Johnson is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Benedictine University in Illinois.

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Story Archive

Attorney General William Barr appears before the House Judiciary Committee on July 28. Matt McClain/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Matt McClain/Pool/Getty Images

Democrats Worry Attorney General Has An 'October Surprise' In The Making

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A San Bernardino County sheriff's deputy at a Black Lives Matter protest this month. The national debate following the death of George Floyd has raised questions about 'qualified immunity' for cops. Christian Monterrosa/AP hide caption

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Christian Monterrosa/AP

Sally Yates, former deputy attorney general, is sworn in to testify Wednesday during a Senate Judiciary Committee oversight hearing. Carolyn Kaster/Pool/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/Pool/AP

Former national security adviser Michael Flynn's legal odyssey continues after the full U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit agreed to hear oral arguments in the case next month. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

Barr Holds His Ground As Democrats Question Him On Controversies

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Attorney General Barr Defends His Decisions And DOJ Actions Before The House

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DOJ Veterans Worry Department's Norms Are Broken

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The Department of Justice is marking 150 years this month and some former employees and officials say the time has come for reforms in its relationship with the White House. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

Trump Wants To Send Federal Law Enforcement Officials To More Cities

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United States Attorney's Office, Southern District of New York, had abandoned a prosecution it already won after it came to light that prosecutors and agents had failed to turn over evidence that could have helped the defendant. VW Pics/Universal Images Group via Getty hide caption

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VW Pics/Universal Images Group via Getty

Federal Government Resumes Capital Punishment, Executes Daniel Lee

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President Trump and his advisers, including Attorney General William Barr, walk through Lafayette Square on June 1 after it was cleared of protesters. Trump then posed for photos holding up a Bible in front of St. John's Episcopal Church. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP