Carrie Johnson Carrie Johnson is NPR's National Justice Correspondent.
Carrie Johnson 2016 square
Stories By

Carrie Johnson

Linda Fittante/NPR
Carrie Johnson 2016
Linda Fittante/NPR

Carrie Johnson

Justice Correspondent

Carrie Johnson is NPR's National Justice Correspondent.

She covers a wide variety of stories about justice issues, law enforcement, and legal affairs for NPR's flagship programs Morning Edition and All Things Considered. Johnson regularly appears on the NPR Politics Podcast.

Prior to coming to NPR in 2010, Johnson worked at the Washington Post for 10 years. Earlier in her career, she wrote about courts for the weekly publication Legal Times.

Her work has been honored with awards from the Robert F. Kennedy Center for Justice and Human Rights, the Society for Professional Journalists, and SABEW. She served as a fellow at the Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard University from 2019-2020. In 2021, the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers honored Johnson with a rarely-bestowed Champion of Justice award for her journalism work.

She has been a finalist for the Loeb Award for financial journalism and for the Pulitzer Prize in breaking news for team coverage of the massacre at Fort Hood, Texas.

Johnson is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Benedictine University in Illinois. She sits on the advisory board for the Center for Journalism Ethics at UW-M and the Historical Society of the D.C. Circuit.

Story Archive

Justice Department wins a conviction in a rarely used seditious conspiracy charge

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1139848171/1139848172" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

J. Edgar Hoover is seen in his Washington, D.C., office in 1936. A new biography of the long-time FBI director looks at public support for his policies during most of his tenure. AP hide caption

toggle caption
AP

Biography traces public support for J. Edgar Hoover in most of his 48 years in power

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1138189651/1138555877" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

U.S. Attorney General Merrick Garland delivers remarks at the U.S. Justice Department Building on November 18, 2022 in Washington, DC. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

A New Special Counsel Will Oversee Investigations Into Donald Trump

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1137813994/1137859402" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Attorney General Garland appoints special counsel to oversee Trump investigations

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1137817713/1137817714" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Jack Smith, seen in 2010 when he was the Justice Department's chief of the Public Integrity Section. Attorney General Merrick Garland named Smith a special counsel on Friday to oversee DOJ's criminal investigations involving former President Donald Trump. Charles Dharapak/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Charles Dharapak/AP

DOJ names Jack Smith as special counsel to oversee Trump criminal investigations

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1137736663/1137969903" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Oath Keepers founder denies he had a role in planning the Capitol attack

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1134908232/1134908233" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Oath Keepers on trial include Jessica Watkins, a former Army soldier

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1134079084/1134079085" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Advocates for some survivors of abuse in prison are asking for their freedom and preparing petitions under a program known as compassionate release. Chalermphon Kumchai/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chalermphon Kumchai/EyeEm/Getty Images

Advocates seek compassionate release for women sexually abused while incarcerated

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1132163791/1132163792" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Bannon receives 4-month sentence for flouting House Jan. 6 panel

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1130422485/1130422486" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript