Carrie Johnson Carrie Johnson is NPR's National Justice Correspondent.
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Carrie Johnson

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Carrie Johnson 2016
Linda Fittante/NPR

Carrie Johnson

Justice Correspondent

Carrie Johnson is NPR's National Justice Correspondent.

She covers a wide variety of stories about justice issues, law enforcement, and legal affairs for NPR's flagship programs Morning Edition and All Things Considered. Johnson regularly appears on the NPR Politics Podcast.

Prior to coming to NPR in 2010, Johnson worked at the Washington Post for 10 years. Earlier in her career, she wrote about courts for the weekly publication Legal Times.

Her work has been honored with awards from the Robert F. Kennedy Center for Justice and Human Rights, the Society for Professional Journalists, and SABEW. She served as a fellow at the Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard University from 2019-2020. In 2021, the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers honored Johnson with a rarely-bestowed Champion of Justice award for her journalism work.

She has been a finalist for the Loeb Award for financial journalism and for the Pulitzer Prize in breaking news for team coverage of the massacre at Fort Hood, Texas.

Johnson is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Benedictine University in Illinois. She sits on the advisory board for the Center for Journalism Ethics at UW-M and the Historical Society of the D.C. Circuit.

Story Archive

Stewart Rhodes, founder of the Oath Keepers, speaks during a 2017 rally outside the White House. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Oath Keepers leader arrested, charged with seditious conspiracy for Jan. 6 riot

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Attorney General Merrick Garland pauses as he speaks at the Department of Justice in Washington on Wednesday, in advance of the one year anniversary of the attack on the U.S. Capitol. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

From left: Julien Xavier Neals, nominee to be U.S. district judge for the District of New Jersey; Zahid Quraishi, nominee to be judge for the District of New Jersey; and Regina Rodriguez, nominee to be judge for the District of Colorado, are sworn in during an April 28 Senate Judiciary Committee hearing. Quraishi has become the first Muslim American federal judge. Tom Williams/AP hide caption

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Tom Williams/AP

Biden had a productive year picking federal judges. The job could get tougher in 2022

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Insurrectionists loyal to President Donald Trump swarm the Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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John Minchillo/AP

Proud Boys member pleads guilty for role in Capitol riot

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Attorney General Merrick Garland speaks on Nov. 15, 2021, in Washington. On Tuesday, the Justice Department issued a new legal opinion that could allow thousands of people released from prison to home confinement at the start of the pandemic to remain free. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

House recommends criminal contempt of Congress charges against Mark Meadows

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Mark Lennihan/AP

Activists wanted Biden to revamp the justice system. Many say they're still waiting

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Criminal justice advocates are pressing the Biden administration for more action

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DOJ is suing Texas, saying its redistricting plans put some voters at a disadvantage

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Steve Bannon, Former Top Trump Aide, Charged With Contempt Of Congress

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Steve Bannon, once chief strategist to then-President Donald Trump, has been charged by the Justice Department with criminal contempt of Congress. Here, he is pictured in August 2018. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP