Carrie Johnson Carrie Johnson is a justice correspondent for the Washington Desk.
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Carrie Johnson

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Carrie Johnson 2016
Linda Fittante/NPR

Carrie Johnson

Justice Correspondent

Carrie Johnson is a justice correspondent for the Washington Desk.

She covers a wide variety of stories about justice issues, law enforcement, and legal affairs for NPR's flagship programs Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as the newscasts and NPR.org.

Johnson has chronicled major challenges to the landmark voting rights law, a botched law enforcement operation targeting gun traffickers along the Southwest border, and the Obama administration's deadly drone program for suspected terrorists overseas.

Prior to coming to NPR in 2010, Johnson worked at the Washington Post for 10 years, where she closely observed the FBI, the Justice Department, and criminal trials of the former leaders of Enron, HealthSouth, and Tyco. Earlier in her career, she wrote about courts for the weekly publication Legal Times.

Her work has been honored with awards from the Robert F. Kennedy Center for Justice and Human Rights, the Society for Professional Journalists, SABEW, and the National Juvenile Defender Center. She has been a finalist for the Loeb Award for financial journalism and for the Pulitzer Prize in breaking news for team coverage of the massacre at Fort Hood, Texas.

Johnson is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Benedictine University in Illinois.

Story Archive

A Legal Debate Has Followed Biden's Vaccine Mandates

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Far-Right Rally Is A Reminder The U.S. Hasn't Reckoned With January 6th Attack

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FBI Director Testified On How Agents Handled The Larry Nassar Case

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The main gate of the privately run Leavenworth Detention Center in 2016. At the time, the prison's operator was known as the Corrections Corporation of America but has since been renamed CoreCivic. Legal advocates are hoping the facility shuts down when its federal contract ends at the end of 2021. Orlin Wagner/AP hide caption

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Orlin Wagner/AP

Biden's Vaccine Rule Covers Two-Thirds Of American Workers

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The DOJ Faces Pressure To Close A Prison Which May Dodge Executive Order To Close

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U.S. Attorney General Merrick Garland holds a press conference Thursday to announce a lawsuit against Texas. The Department of Justice is seeking a permanent injunction against the state's new abortion law. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Justice Department Sues Texas Over New Abortion Ban

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Attacks On Minorities Are At Their Highest Level In 12 Years, FBI Reports

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COVID-19 vaccine and testing signage is displayed at a City of Long Beach mobile vaccination clinic at California State University, Long Beach, campus on Wednesday in California. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

Can The Government Make Me Get The COVID Vaccine?

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There is a group of about 150 people in federal prison known as "old law" prisoners who committed crimes before November 1987 and still have little hope of release. Cornelia Li for NPR hide caption

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Cornelia Li for NPR

Some Older Prisoners Aren't Eligible For Compassionate Release. Lawmakers Want Change

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