Carrie Johnson Carrie Johnson is a justice correspondent for the Washington Desk.
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Carrie Johnson

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Carrie Johnson 2016
Linda Fittante/NPR

Carrie Johnson

Justice Correspondent

Carrie Johnson is a justice correspondent for the Washington Desk.

She covers a wide variety of stories about justice issues, law enforcement, and legal affairs for NPR's flagship programs Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as the newscasts and NPR.org.

Johnson has chronicled major challenges to the landmark voting rights law, a botched law enforcement operation targeting gun traffickers along the Southwest border, and the Obama administration's deadly drone program for suspected terrorists overseas.

Prior to coming to NPR in 2010, Johnson worked at the Washington Post for 10 years, where she closely observed the FBI, the Justice Department, and criminal trials of the former leaders of Enron, HealthSouth, and Tyco. Earlier in her career, she wrote about courts for the weekly publication Legal Times.

Her work has been honored with awards from the Robert F. Kennedy Center for Justice and Human Rights, the Society for Professional Journalists, SABEW, and the National Juvenile Defender Center. She has been a finalist for the Loeb Award for financial journalism and for the Pulitzer Prize in breaking news for team coverage of the massacre at Fort Hood, Texas.

Johnson is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Benedictine University in Illinois.

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Story Archive

The building that houses the U.S. Attorney's Office for the Southern District of New York is pictured in 2015. Emails and text messages from prosecutors in that office have come out as part of an inquiry into their handling of a case. Mary Altaffer/AP hide caption

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Mary Altaffer/AP

A U.S. federal courtroom sits empty in 2017 in Honolulu. A new study finds that judges with backgrounds as prosecutors or corporate lawyers are more likely to rule in favor of employers. Jennifer Sinco Kelleher/AP hide caption

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Jennifer Sinco Kelleher/AP

Merrick Garland, President Biden's nominee for U.S. attorney general, speaks in Wilmington, Del., on Jan. 7. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Merrick Garland Heads For Confirmation Hearing, 5 Years After He Was Denied A Vote

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People walk on a tour of the State Correctional Institution at Phoenix in Collegeville, Pa., in 2018. Two brothers who were at the facility have been freed by clemency after expecting to spend their lives incarcerated. Jacqueline Larma/AP hide caption

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Jacqueline Larma/AP

Brothers Who Expected To Die In Pennsylvania Prison Now Free After Clemency

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Trump Wasn't Convicted On Capitol Riot Charge, But Legal Repercussions Still Possible

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Is Trump's Whataboutism Defense Enough Cover For GOP Acquittal?

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House Managers Use Video To Show How Close Rioters Got To Lawmakers

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A Philadelphia state correctional facility is pictured in June 2018. In Philadelphia, the concept of "felony murder" means someone can spend their life in prison if someone died during a felony act, even if that person did not intend to commit murder. Jacqueline Larma/AP hide caption

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Jacqueline Larma/AP

Life Without Parole For 'Felony Murder': Pa. Case Targets Sentencing Law

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Biden Administration Aims To Advance Racial Equity With Executive Actions

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