Carrie Johnson Carrie Johnson is a justice correspondent for the Washington Desk.
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Carrie Johnson

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Carrie Johnson 2016
Linda Fittante/NPR

Carrie Johnson

Justice Correspondent

Carrie Johnson is a justice correspondent for the Washington Desk.

She covers a wide variety of stories about justice issues, law enforcement, and legal affairs for NPR's flagship programs Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as the newscasts and NPR.org.

Johnson has chronicled major challenges to the landmark voting rights law, a botched law enforcement operation targeting gun traffickers along the Southwest border, and the Obama administration's deadly drone program for suspected terrorists overseas.

Prior to coming to NPR in 2010, Johnson worked at the Washington Post for 10 years, where she closely observed the FBI, the Justice Department, and criminal trials of the former leaders of Enron, HealthSouth, and Tyco. Earlier in her career, she wrote about courts for the weekly publication Legal Times.

Her work has been honored with awards from the Robert F. Kennedy Center for Justice and Human Rights, the Society for Professional Journalists, SABEW, and the National Juvenile Defender Center. She has been a finalist for the Loeb Award for financial journalism and for the Pulitzer Prize in breaking news for team coverage of the massacre at Fort Hood, Texas.

Johnson is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Benedictine University in Illinois.

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Story Archive

Kristen Clarke delivers remarks after being nominated to be civil rights division assistant attorney general by then-President-elect Joe Biden on Jan. 7. Her confirmation hearing is on Wednesday. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Kristen Clarke's Civil Rights Record Led Her To Barrier-Breaking DOJ Nomination

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Advocates Say How Gun Crimes Are Charged In Washington D.C. Is A Civil Rights Issue

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Biden Made His First Judicial Picks This Week, Including A Supreme Court Contender

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Criminal Justice Reform Advocates Say They're Anxious To See More Action From Biden

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A private detention center in Mesa, Ariz., is pictured in January 2016. President Biden soon after taking office signed an executive order to phase out private prisons and jails, a move that has U.S. marshals raising some concerns. Ricardo Arduengo/AP hide caption

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Ricardo Arduengo/AP

Within the Federal Bureau of Prisons, inmates are asked to "voluntarily" agree to electronic monitoring in order to use the bureau's email system. Above, a prison cell block is seen at the Federal Correctional Institution, El Reno in Oklahoma in 2015. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

When It Comes To Email, Some Prisoners Say Attorney-Client Privilege Has Been Erased

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As Biden And Congress Delay Action On Guns, Colorado Mulls Restrictions

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FBI Director Wray Discusses Capitol Riot Investigation, Domestic Terrorism Threats

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FBI Director Christopher Wray tells NPR that the bureau will keep working on its sprawling investigation into the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol "no matter how long it takes." Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

'We're Going To Keep Digging,' FBI Director Wray Says Of Capitol Siege

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Merrick Garland speaks during his attorney general confirmation hearing with the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill on Feb. 22. Demetrius Freeman/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Deputy Attorney General nominee Lisa Monaco speaks during an event with then-President-elect Joe Biden in Wilmington, Del., on Jan. 7. Her confirmation hearing is on Tuesday. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

The building that houses the U.S. Attorney's Office for the Southern District of New York is pictured in 2015. Emails and text messages from prosecutors in that office have come out as part of an inquiry into their handling of a case. Mary Altaffer/AP hide caption

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Mary Altaffer/AP

'Yeah, We Lied': Messages Show Prosecutors' Panic Over Missteps In Federal Case

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