Carrie Johnson Carrie Johnson is a justice correspondent for the Washington Desk.
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Carrie Johnson

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Carrie Johnson 2016
Linda Fittante/NPR

Carrie Johnson

Justice Correspondent

Carrie Johnson is a justice correspondent for the Washington Desk.

She covers a wide variety of stories about justice issues, law enforcement, and legal affairs for NPR's flagship programs Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as the newscasts and NPR.org.

Johnson has chronicled major challenges to the landmark voting rights law, a botched law enforcement operation targeting gun traffickers along the Southwest border, and the Obama administration's deadly drone program for suspected terrorists overseas.

Prior to coming to NPR in 2010, Johnson worked at the Washington Post for 10 years, where she closely observed the FBI, the Justice Department, and criminal trials of the former leaders of Enron, HealthSouth, and Tyco. Earlier in her career, she wrote about courts for the weekly publication Legal Times.

Her work has been honored with awards from the Robert F. Kennedy Center for Justice and Human Rights, the Society for Professional Journalists, SABEW, and the National Juvenile Defender Center. She has been a finalist for the Loeb Award for financial journalism and for the Pulitzer Prize in breaking news for team coverage of the massacre at Fort Hood, Texas.

Johnson is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Benedictine University in Illinois.

Story Archive

The moves by the Justice Department are part of the Biden administration's push to demonstrate it is on guard amid new voting restrictions that Republican-led states have proposed and enacted. Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

Supporters of former President Donald Trump flock to the Jan. 6 rally in Washington, D.C. Officials who were speakers at that rally are under scrutiny over the riot at the U.S. Capitol later that day. Samuel Corum/Getty Images hide caption

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Samuel Corum/Getty Images

A Lawsuit Against Jan. 6 Rally Speakers Forces DOJ To Consider Who's Legally Immune

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Attorney General Merrick Garland Addresses Gun Trafficking During Chicago Visit

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Trump Inaugural Committee Chair Tom Barrack Arrested On Illegal Lobbying Charges

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Thomas Barrack delivers a speech at the Republican National Convention in July 2016. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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A Former Trump Adviser Is Charged With Acting As An Agent Of The United Arab Emirates

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Rudy Giuliani points to a map as he speaks to the press about various lawsuits related to the 2020 election on Nov. 19, 2020. He and other Trump lawyers are now under scrutiny for their roles in promoting false claims of election fraud. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Trump Lawyers Who Spread False Election Claims Are Now Defending Themselves In Court

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Watchdog: FBI Failed To Properly Respond To Gymnasts' Sex Abuse Allegations

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D.C. Attorney General Karl Racine, pictured in 2019, is hoping to change how the justice system handles cases involving 16- and 17-year-olds who are charged as adults. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Teens Can Get Swept Into Adult Prisons. D.C.'s Attorney General Wants To Change That

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"Mean Girls" Meets The Supreme Court Pt. II: SCOTUS Supports Student Free Speech

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