Carrie Johnson Carrie Johnson is NPR's National Justice Correspondent.
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Carrie Johnson

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Carrie Johnson 2016
Linda Fittante/NPR

Carrie Johnson

Justice Correspondent

Carrie Johnson is NPR's National Justice Correspondent.

She covers a wide variety of stories about justice issues, law enforcement, and legal affairs for NPR's flagship programs Morning Edition and All Things Considered. Johnson regularly appears on the NPR Politics Podcast.

Prior to coming to NPR in 2010, Johnson worked at the Washington Post for 10 years. Earlier in her career, she wrote about courts for the weekly publication Legal Times.

Her work has been honored with awards from the Robert F. Kennedy Center for Justice and Human Rights, the Society for Professional Journalists, and SABEW. She served as a fellow at the Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard University from 2019-2020. In 2021, the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers honored Johnson with a rarely-bestowed Champion of Justice award for her journalism work.

She has been a finalist for the Loeb Award for financial journalism and for the Pulitzer Prize in breaking news for team coverage of the massacre at Fort Hood, Texas.

Johnson is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Benedictine University in Illinois. She sits on the advisory board for the Center for Journalism Ethics at UW-M and the Historical Society of the D.C. Circuit.

Story Archive

The FBI conducted a search at ex-President Trump's Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida

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Inmates give Washington, D.C., ideas for curbing gun violence

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Justice Department files a lawsuit against Idaho's restrictive abortion law

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A Capitol rioter has received the most severe punishment to date

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Jan. 6 defendant Guy Reffitt faces sentencing. The DOJ wants him to get 15 years

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From left: Former U.S. Olympic gymnasts Aly Raisman and McKayla Maroney and three-time national champion Jessica Howard participate in a news conference following a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Sept. 15, 2021. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Steve Bannon is the first Trump associate to be convicted for Jan. 6 actions

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Members of the National Guard and the Washington D.C. police keep a small group of demonstrators away from the Capital after thousands of Donald Trump supporters stormed the United States Capitol building following a "Stop the Steal" rally on January 06, 2021 in Washington, DC. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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NPR Politics Special: What We Learned From The Jan. 6 Hearings

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Members of the National Guard and the Washington D.C. police keep a small group of demonstrators away from the Capital after thousands of Donald Trump supporters stormed the United States Capitol building following a "Stop the Steal" rally on January 06, 2021 in Washington, DC. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Exposing The Secrets Of The January 6th Attack

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Former White House strategist Steve Bannon, center, speaks with reporters as he departs federal court on Friday, July 22, 2022, in Washington. Accompanying Bannon are his attorneys David Schoen, left, and M. Evan Corcoran. Bannon, a one-time adviser to former President Donald Trump, was found guilty of criminal contempt of Congress charges. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Former White House chief strategist Steve Bannon arrives at the U.S. District Court House as his trial for contempt of Congress continues on Wednesday. Stefani Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Stefani Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Supporters of former White House senior adviser Steve Bannon rally outside the U.S. District Court House during jury selection in his trial on July 18, 2022 in Washington, D.C. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Jury selection starts for Steve Bannon's trial. He's Donald Trump's former adviser

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What we've learned so far about Jan. 6

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