Carrie Johnson Carrie Johnson is a justice correspondent for the Washington Desk.
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Carrie Johnson

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Carrie Johnson 2016
Linda Fittante/NPR

Carrie Johnson

Justice Correspondent

Carrie Johnson is a justice correspondent for the Washington Desk.

She covers a wide variety of stories about justice issues, law enforcement, and legal affairs for NPR's flagship programs Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as the newscasts and NPR.org.

Johnson has chronicled major challenges to the landmark voting rights law, a botched law enforcement operation targeting gun traffickers along the Southwest border, and the Obama administration's deadly drone program for suspected terrorists overseas.

Prior to coming to NPR in 2010, Johnson worked at the Washington Post for 10 years, where she closely observed the FBI, the Justice Department, and criminal trials of the former leaders of Enron, HealthSouth, and Tyco. Earlier in her career, she wrote about courts for the weekly publication Legal Times.

Her work has been honored with awards from the Robert F. Kennedy Center for Justice and Human Rights, the Society for Professional Journalists, SABEW, and the National Juvenile Defender Center. She has been a finalist for the Loeb Award for financial journalism and for the Pulitzer Prize in breaking news for team coverage of the massacre at Fort Hood, Texas.

Johnson is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Benedictine University in Illinois.

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Story Archive

Former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe is suing the Trump administration over what he claims was his wrongful termination and the defamation he endured at the time of his firing. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

The Thurgood Marshall United States Courthouse, which hears cases from the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York and United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, stands in Lower Manhattan, N.Y., on Jan. 18. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Trump's Impact On Federal Courts: Judicial Nominees By The Numbers

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DOJ Could Resume Executions In The Federal Prison System As Early As December

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Justice Department To Resume Federal Executions In December

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Lawmakers Question Mueller Over His Report On Russian Election Interference In 2016

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What To Expect From Robert Mueller's Congressional Testimony

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From left, Hugh Hurwitz, acting director of the Bureau of Prisons; Deputy Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen; and David Muhlhausen, director of the National Institute of Justice, appear at a press conference at the Department of Justice on Friday. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Thousands Freed From Prison Custody As DOJ Implements Sentencing Reform Law

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DOJ Says Local Governments Need To Prepare For Ransomware Attacks

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Assistant Attorney General Brian Benczkowski at Justice Department headquarters. He oversees more than 600 prosecutors and the others who work in the criminal division. Shuran Huang/NPR hide caption

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Financier Taken Into Federal Custody On Allegations Of Sex Trafficking

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Washington, D.C., Prosecutors Launch Restorative Justice Program For Juveniles

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