Carrie Johnson Carrie Johnson is NPR's National Justice Correspondent.
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Carrie Johnson

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Carrie Johnson 2016
Linda Fittante/NPR

Carrie Johnson

Justice Correspondent

Carrie Johnson is NPR's National Justice Correspondent.

She covers a wide variety of stories about justice issues, law enforcement, and legal affairs for NPR's flagship programs Morning Edition and All Things Considered. Johnson regularly appears on the NPR Politics Podcast.

Prior to coming to NPR in 2010, Johnson worked at the Washington Post for 10 years. Earlier in her career, she wrote about courts for the weekly publication Legal Times.

Her work has been honored with awards from the Robert F. Kennedy Center for Justice and Human Rights, the Society for Professional Journalists, and SABEW. She served as a fellow at the Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard University from 2019-2020. In 2021, the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers honored Johnson with a rarely-bestowed Champion of Justice award for her journalism work.

She has been a finalist for the Loeb Award for financial journalism and for the Pulitzer Prize in breaking news for team coverage of the massacre at Fort Hood, Texas.

Johnson is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Benedictine University in Illinois. She sits on the advisory board for the Center for Journalism Ethics at UW-M and the Historical Society of the D.C. Circuit.

Story Archive

Friday

Brianne Chapman protests outside the federal courthouse in Washington, D.C., on Friday, during the sentencing hearing for Julian Khater and George Tanios. Khater pleaded guilty to assaulting Capitol Police Officer Brian Sicknick with pepper spray on Jan. 6, 2021. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

Tuesday

Justice Department racks up some important victories in Jan. 6 cases

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Tuesday

A video showing Proud Boys members appear on screen during a House Select Committee hearing to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the US Capitol, in the Cannon House Office Building on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. on June 9, 2022. MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images

Saturday

Biden joins Trump under scrutiny of special counsel investigating classified documents

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Friday

A special counsel will probe documents found at Biden's home and private office

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Proud Boys leader Enrique Tarrio, seen in May 2021, is on trial in Washington, accused of crimes related to the Jan. 6 storming of the Capitol. Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images

Thursday

US Attorney General Merrick Garland arrives to name an independent special counsel to probe President Joe Biden's alleged mishandling of classified documents at the US Justice Department in Washington, DC on January 12, 2023. OLIVIER DOULIERY/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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OLIVIER DOULIERY/AFP via Getty Images

Tuesday

A bill that would have impacted racial disparity in cocaine crimes died in the Senate

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Monday

Orrin Jackson, center, is one of the nonprofit Dream.org's network of formerly incarcerated people who lobbied Congress to pass the Eliminating a Quantifiably Unjust Application of the Law (EQUAL) Act. Shown here are lawmakers and bill advocates from Dream.org and Families Against Mandatory Minimums (FAMM). Dream.org hide caption

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Dream.org

A bill that would have impacted racial disparity in cocaine crimes died in the Senate

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Friday

The ongoing quest for accountability two years after the Jan. 6 riot

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Tuesday

Encore: President Biden has made choosing diverse federal judges a priority

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Monday

President Biden and Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson celebrate her confirmation to the U.S. Supreme Court. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

President Biden has made choosing diverse federal judges a priority

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