Carrie Johnson Carrie Johnson is a justice correspondent for the Washington Desk.
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Carrie Johnson

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Carrie Johnson 2016
Linda Fittante/NPR

Carrie Johnson

Justice Correspondent

Carrie Johnson is a justice correspondent for the Washington Desk.

She covers a wide variety of stories about justice issues, law enforcement, and legal affairs for NPR's flagship programs Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as the newscasts and NPR.org.

Johnson has chronicled major challenges to the landmark voting rights law, a botched law enforcement operation targeting gun traffickers along the Southwest border, and the Obama administration's deadly drone program for suspected terrorists overseas.

Prior to coming to NPR in 2010, Johnson worked at the Washington Post for 10 years, where she closely observed the FBI, the Justice Department, and criminal trials of the former leaders of Enron, HealthSouth, and Tyco. Earlier in her career, she wrote about courts for the weekly publication Legal Times.

Her work has been honored with awards from the Robert F. Kennedy Center for Justice and Human Rights, the Society for Professional Journalists, SABEW, and the National Juvenile Defender Center. She has been a finalist for the Loeb Award for financial journalism and for the Pulitzer Prize in breaking news for team coverage of the massacre at Fort Hood, Texas.

Johnson is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Benedictine University in Illinois.

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Story Archive

The Latest On The Federal Investigation Into The Riot At The Capitol

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Civil liberties advocates say they fear that the kinds of measures that could be put in place after last week's riot at the U.S. Capitol could disproportionately hurt minorities. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Officials Say An Investigation Into Insurrection At The U.S. Capitol May Take Weeks

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Judge Merrick Garland Is Biden's Pick To Be U.S. Attorney General

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Merrick Garland came to national attention in 2016 when President Barack Obama nominated him to the U.S. Supreme Court. Senate Republicans denied Garland even a hearing for the post. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Merrick Garland Is To Be Joe Biden's Nominee For Attorney General

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U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Virginia Zachary Terwilliger, shown outside the federal courthouse in Alexandria, Va., in October, is headed into private practice. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

What Will The Courts Look Like Under Joe Biden?

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With Exception Of Federal Government, Death Penalties Reach Historic Low In U.S.

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What Will Justice And Foreign Policy Look Like Under Joe Biden?

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Christmas Chaos: President Throws Relief Into Doubt

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President Trump Pushes The Boundaries Of His Pardon Power

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The Justice Department previously declined to comment on how it is implementing President Trump's executive order, but most diversity programs there appear to have been put on hold since autumn. Ramin Talaie/Getty Images hide caption

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A police officer walks on Dec. 21, 1988, by the nose of Pan Am Flight 103 near Lockerbie, Scotland, where it lay after a bomb aboard exploded, killing a total of 270 people. Martin Cleaver/AP hide caption

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Martin Cleaver/AP

32 Years Later, U.S. Charges Alleged Bomb-Maker In Pan Am Flight 103 Attack

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Who Is Jeffrey Rosen, New Acting Attorney General?

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