Carrie Johnson Carrie Johnson is a justice correspondent for the Washington Desk.
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Carrie Johnson

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Carrie Johnson 2016
Linda Fittante/NPR

Carrie Johnson

Justice Correspondent

Carrie Johnson is a justice correspondent for the Washington Desk.

She covers a wide variety of stories about justice issues, law enforcement, and legal affairs for NPR's flagship programs Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as the newscasts and NPR.org.

Johnson has chronicled major challenges to the landmark voting rights law, a botched law enforcement operation targeting gun traffickers along the Southwest border, and the Obama administration's deadly drone program for suspected terrorists overseas.

Prior to coming to NPR in 2010, Johnson worked at the Washington Post for 10 years, where she closely observed the FBI, the Justice Department, and criminal trials of the former leaders of Enron, HealthSouth, and Tyco. Earlier in her career, she wrote about courts for the weekly publication Legal Times.

Her work has been honored with awards from the Robert F. Kennedy Center for Justice and Human Rights, the Society for Professional Journalists, SABEW, and the National Juvenile Defender Center. She has been a finalist for the Loeb Award for financial journalism and for the Pulitzer Prize in breaking news for team coverage of the massacre at Fort Hood, Texas.

Johnson is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Benedictine University in Illinois.

Story Archive

Andrew McCabe, shown here in 2017, was fired in 2018 by the Trump administration hours before his retirement. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Fired FBI official Andrew McCabe wins retirement benefits and back pay in settlement

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Enforcement of the new abortion law in Texas is blocked by a federal judge

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DOJ will revisit decision not to charge FBI agents in failed Nassar case

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United States gymnasts Kaylee Lorincz and Simone Biles hug after a Senate Judiciary hearing about the Inspector General's report on the FBI's handling of the Larry Nassar investigation on Sept. 15, 2021. Saul Loeb/Pool/AP hide caption

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Saul Loeb/Pool/AP

Abortion-rights supporters march outside the Texas Capitol in Austin on Sept. 1. Sergio Flores/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Sergio Flores/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Texas' abortion law is back in court

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Counterfeit pills are designed to look like regular prescription drugs, according to Deputy Attorney General Lisa Monaco. Here are counterfeit 30 milligram oxycodone tablets. U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration hide caption

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U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration

More Than 800 People Have Been Arrested As The DOJ Clamps Down On Fake Pills

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John Hinckley Jr., Who Shot Ronald Reagan, Will Be Unconditionally Released In 2022

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The Department Of Justice Monitors For Partisan State Election Audits

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A Legal Debate Has Followed Biden's Vaccine Mandates

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Far-Right Rally Is A Reminder The U.S. Hasn't Reckoned With January 6th Attack

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FBI Director Testified On How Agents Handled The Larry Nassar Case

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The main gate of the privately run Leavenworth Detention Center in 2016. At the time, the prison's operator was known as the Corrections Corporation of America but has since been renamed CoreCivic. Legal advocates are hoping the facility shuts down when its federal contract ends at the end of 2021. Orlin Wagner/AP hide caption

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Orlin Wagner/AP