Sonari Glinton Sonari Glinton is a NPR Business Desk reporter based at our NPR West bureau.
Sonari Glinton 2010
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Sonari Glinton

A version of Ford's flagship F-150 pickup truck that runs on natural gas. Courtesy of Ford Motor Company hide caption

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Courtesy of Ford Motor Company

Ford Taking America's Best-Selling Truck All 'Natural'

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Woodward Avenue runs through Midtown, a Detroit neighborhood that is reviving in the midst of the larger city's decline. In the background is downtown Detroit. Carlos Osorio/AP hide caption

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Carlos Osorio/AP

Reinvigorating A Detroit Neighborhood, Block By Block

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Jeff Caldwell, a chassis assembly line supervisor, checks a vehicle on the assembly line at the Chrysler Jefferson North Assembly plant in Detroit on May 8. Paul Sancya/AP hide caption

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Paul Sancya/AP

Kids play with toy cars like the Cozy Coupe partly because they want to imitate their parents: turn a steering wheel, open a door, strap a Christmas tree to the roof. But toy cars aren't just fun and games; they can suggest future trends in the automobile industry. Frank Guido/Flickr hide caption

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Frank Guido/Flickr

June Job Numbers Perk Up Optimists

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A worker installs parts on a Chrysler SUV engine at the Jefferson North Assembly Plant in Detroit. Plants in the U.S. are now operating above 90 percent capacity, but automakers are wary of adding large numbers of new workers. Geoff Robins/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Geoff Robins/AFP/Getty Images

A man views merchandise at an American Apparel store on the Third Street Promenade in Santa Monica, Calif., on April 24, 2012. Each year, the company makes more than 40 million articles of clothing out of its L.A.-area factory. Reed Saxon/AP hide caption

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Reed Saxon/AP

Garment Industry Follows Threads Of Immigration Overhaul

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Samuel Ku, who runs AG Jeans alongside his father, says a European tariff puts thousands of U.S. clothing jobs at risk. Amanda Marsalis hide caption

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Amanda Marsalis

More Jobs, But Wait: They May Not Pay Much

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Shoppers Should Avoid Sandy-Damaged Vehicles

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The Hidden Dangers Of Giving Car Advice

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Google, Microsoft Look Past Desktop Computers To Increase Earnings

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