Scott Neuman Scott Neuman is a correspondent for NPR's Enterprise Desk
Stories By

Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman

Correspondent, Enterprise Desk

Scott Neuman is a correspondent for NPR's Enterprise Desk, based in Washington, D.C.

He joined the network in 2007 as a breaking news editor and reporter, but has since moved into writing longer features. At NPR, he's reported on a wide range of topics, with a particular interest in science and international news. In recent years, he's covered Florida's Hurricane Ian and the 2023 Gaza war.

Before joining NPR, Neuman worked at a variety of news organizations as both an editor and correspondent. At The Associated Press in Bangkok, Thailand, he was an editor on the news agency's Asia Desk, during which time he covered the 2004 Indonesian tsunami. Prior to that, he was an editor and correspondent with The Wall Street Journal in Hong Kong, and worked extensively in Pakistan in the aftermath of Sept. 11, 2001. He also spent time with the AP in New York, and in India as first a freelancer and then later, writing for United Press International.

Born and raised in Indiana, Neuman got his start in journalism at public radio in the Midwest, beginning in his hometown of Fort Wayne, and later, at NPR stations in Illinois.

He is a graduate of Purdue University. He lives with his wife, Noi, and their beloved Labrador/mastiff mix, Duncan, on the Chesapeake Bay in Maryland. In his spare time, he enjoys sailing, woodworking and amateur astronomy.

Story Archive

Wednesday

Tuesday

Tom Noffsinger stands in his garage workshop, where he uses a SawStop table saw for woodworking at his home in Raleigh, North Carolina. About 20 years ago, Noffsinger had a table saw accident and almost lost his thumb. Cornell Watson for NPR hide caption

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Cornell Watson for NPR

Sunday

A steel frame from the collapsed Francis Scott Key bridge in Baltimore covers the top of the Dali ship. The container ship crashed into the bridge on Tuesday. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

Authorities are clearing the damage from the Baltimore Key Bridge collapse

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Friday

Wednesday

The container ship Dali after it ran into and collapsed the Francis Scott Key Bridge on Tuesday in Baltimore. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Saturday

Eclipse enthusiasts wearing protective glasses view a partial eclipse from Beckman Lawn at Caltech in Pasadena, Calif., on Aug. 21, 2017. Another solar eclipse is just weeks away. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

The eclipse gives astronomy clubs an opportunity to shine

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Sunday

So-called point-of-sale donations have sharply increased in recent years, bringing in hundreds of millions of dollars a year. But the requests to "round up" your bill for charity have really taken off. Josie Norton for NPR hide caption

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Josie Norton for NPR

Tuesday

NASA astronaut Victor Glover will be making his second flight to space as the pilot of the Artemis II mission. Riley McClenaghan/NASA hide caption

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Riley McClenaghan/NASA

Thursday

A widespread cellphone outage left thousands of users without service today

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Friday

Protesters light candles on Friday in front of the Russian Embassy in Prague after the announcement that the Kremlin's most prominent critic, Alexei Navalny, had died in an Arctic prison. Milan Kammermayer/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Milan Kammermayer/AFP via Getty Images

Alexei Navalny is seen in 2012 behind the bars in a police van after he was detained during protests in Moscow a day after Vladimir Putin's inauguration. Sergey Ponomarev/AP hide caption

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Sergey Ponomarev/AP

Alexei Navalny, Russian politician who opposed Putin to the end, has died in prison

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Wednesday

Martin Luther King Jr. makes his last public appearance, at the Mason Temple in Memphis, Tenn., on April 3, 1968. The following day, King was assassinated on his motel balcony. Charles Kelly/AP hide caption

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Charles Kelly/AP

Tuesday

At a partially operating Evergrande commercial complex in Beijing on Monday, a man walks past a map of China that shows Evergrande's commercial complexes throughout the country. Evergrande was once listed as the world's most valuable real estate company, but on Monday, a Hong Kong court ordered it to be liquidated. Greg Baker/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Greg Baker/AFP via Getty Images

Wednesday

Arno Penzias (right) and Robert Woodrow Wilson, who co-discovered the afterglow of the Big Bang. The Bell Lab employees, who won the 1978 Nobel Prize in physics for their discovery, are shown standing in front of their microwave antenna at Bell Labs in Holmdel, N.J., on Oct. 17, 1978. AP hide caption

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AP

Saturday

The Galaxy Leader cargo ship was seized by Houthi fighters in the Red Sea in late November. The Bahamas-flagged, British-owned Galaxy Leader, operated by a Japanese firm but having links to an Israeli businessman, was headed from Turkey to India when it was seized and rerouted to the Yemeni port of Hodeida. AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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AFP via Getty Images

Wednesday

A fireball from an explosion erupts during Israeli bombardment on Khan Younis from Rafah in the southern Gaza Strip early on Wednesday. AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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AFP via Getty Images

Friday

Internally displaced Palestinian children use a makeshift wheeled cart to haul water in Rafah in the southern Gaza Strip on Sunday, as battles continue between Israel and the militant group Hamas. Mohammed Abed/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mohammed Abed/AFP via Getty Images

Wednesday

An Israeli battle tank moves along the border between the Gaza Strip and southern Israel on Wednesday as battles between Israel and Hamas continue. Jack Guez/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jack Guez/AFP via Getty Images

Sunday

Volunteers work at a dairy farm near Nir Oz, one of the communities attacked on Oct. 7 by Hamas militants, in southern Israel on Wednesday. People from Israel and around the world have been rotating in to volunteer at the farm, helping fill the gap left by the workers who are no longer here. Tamir Kalifa for NPR hide caption

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Tamir Kalifa for NPR

The Hamas attack left many Israeli farms abandoned — some worry forever

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Friday

More than 20,000 people have now been killed in Gaza since the start of the war, according to Gaza's Ministry of Health. Above, a home in Rafah is shown in the aftermath of an Israeli airstrike. Anas Baba/NPR hide caption

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Anas Baba/NPR

Monday

People mourn as they collect the bodies of Palestinians killed in an airstrike on Monday in Khan Yunis, Gaza. The United Kingdom, France and Germany are the latest countries to call on Israel to reach a "sustainable truce" after more than two months of war in Gaza. Ahmad Hasaballah/Getty Images hide caption

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Ahmad Hasaballah/Getty Images

Saturday

A protester with red paint on his hand marches through the streets after demonstrating outside the Israel Defense Forces headquarters on Friday in Tel Aviv, Israel. Earlier, the IDF had said its forces accidentally killed three hostages being held in Gaza when it mistakenly identified them as potential threats. Alexi J. Rosenfeld/Getty Images hide caption

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Alexi J. Rosenfeld/Getty Images