Scott Neuman Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features.
Stories By

Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman

Writer/Editor, Digital News

Scott Neuman is a reporter and editor, working mainly on breaking news for NPR's digital and radio platforms.

He brings to NPR years of experience as a journalist at a variety of news organizations based all over the world. He came to NPR from The Associated Press in Bangkok, Thailand, where he worked as an editor on the news agency's Asia Desk. Prior to that, Neuman worked in Hong Kong with The Wall Street Journal, where among other things he reported extensively from Pakistan in the wake of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. He also spent time with the AP in New York, and in India as a bureau chief for United Press International.

A native Hoosier, Neuman's roots in public radio (and the Midwest) run deep. He started his career at member station WBNI in Fort Wayne, and worked later in Illinois for WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford and WILL in Champaign-Urbana.

Neuman is a graduate of Purdue University. He lives with his wife, Noi, on the Chesapeake Bay in Maryland.

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

U.S. Special Representative for Afghanistan Reconciliation Zalmay Khalilzad attends the Intra-Afghan Dialogue talks in the Qatari capital, Doha, in July. Karim Jaafar /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Karim Jaafar /AFP via Getty Images

U.S., Afghanistan And Taliban Announce 7-Day 'Reduction In Violence'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/808029567/808034793" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Local residents protest the plans to quarantine evacuees from coronavirus-hit China at a local hospital, in the settlement of Novi Sanzhary, Ukraine, on Thursday. Maksym Mykhailyk/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Maksym Mykhailyk/AFP via Getty Images

A police officer guards the road in front of a house where police found the bodies of the suspected gunman and his mother, in Hanau, Germany, on Thursday. Michael Probst/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Michael Probst/AP

Shootings In Germany Kill 10; Police Suspect Far-Right Extremism

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/807661733/807677356" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

U.S. Ambassador to Germany Richard Grenell speaks during a news conference after a meeting with Serbian President Aleksandar Vucic in Belgrade, Serbia, last month. Darko Vojinovic/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Darko Vojinovic/AP

A masked paramilitary policeman stands guard alone at a deserted Tiananmen Gate in Beijing following the coronavirus outbreak. China on Wednesday said it has revoked the press credentials of three U.S. reporters over a headline for an opinion column it deems racist and slanderous. Andy Wong/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Andy Wong/AP

A truck sits parked at railway tracks during a protest near Belleville, Ontario, Canada, on Thursday. Demonstrators have been disrupting railroads and other infrastructure across Canada for more than a week to protest the planned Coastal GasLink pipeline. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Bloomberg via Getty Images

A passenger (right) is hugged by Cambodia Prime Minister Hun Sen after she disembarked from the MS Westerdam at the port of Sihanoukville, Cambodia, on Friday. Heng Sinith/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Heng Sinith/AP

Harkness Tower on Yale University's campus in 2016. The Department of Education said Yale failed to disclosed a total of $375 million in foreign money. Beth Harpaz/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Beth Harpaz/AP

A man wearing a face mask has his temperature checked before entering a community hospital in Shanghai on Thursday. China's official death toll and infection numbers from the deadly COVID-19 coronavirus spiked dramatically on Thursday after authorities changed their counting methods. Noel Celis/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Noel Celis/AFP via Getty Images

A Change In How 1 Chinese Province Reports Coronavirus Adds Thousands Of Cases

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/805519117/805556302" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Philippine Navy personnel watch the U.S. Navy's multipurpose amphibious assault ship USS WASP during the Joint U.S.-Philippine military exercises in April 2019. Bullit Marquez/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Bullit Marquez/AP

Police and army soldiers, carrying rifles and dressed in battle fatigues, entered the parliament building to show support for President Nayib Bukele's $109 million loan plan to better equip them. Salvador Melendez/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Salvador Melendez/AP

Workers disinfect closed shop lots following the coronavirus outbreak in Hubei, China, on Monday. Officials reported on Tuesday that the country's overall death toll had passed 1,000. Cheng Min/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Cheng Min/AP

A reproduction of a combo of two pictures of Qassim al-Rimi, leader of al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula, who was killed in a U.S. counterterrorism operation. Yemeni Ministry of Interior/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Yemeni Ministry of Interior/AFP via Getty Images

A photo of the late ophthalmologist Li Wenliang at a hospital in Wuhan, China, on Friday. Li, who is being hailed for his efforts to alert the medical profession to the new virus, died Friday after becoming infected. AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
AFP via Getty Images