Scott Neuman Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features.
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Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman

Writer/Editor, Digital News

Scott Neuman is a reporter and editor, working mainly on breaking news for NPR's digital and radio platforms.

He brings to NPR years of experience as a journalist at a variety of news organizations based all over the world. He came to NPR from The Associated Press in Bangkok, Thailand, where he worked as an editor on the news agency's Asia Desk. Prior to that, Neuman worked in Hong Kong with The Wall Street Journal, where among other things he reported extensively from Pakistan in the wake of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. He also spent time with the AP in New York, and in India as a bureau chief for United Press International.

A native Hoosier, Neuman's roots in public radio (and the Midwest) run deep. He started his career at member station WBNI in Fort Wayne, and worked later in Illinois for WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford and WILL in Champaign-Urbana.

Neuman is a graduate of Purdue University. He lives with his wife, Noi, on the Chesapeake Bay in Maryland.

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A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket lifts off Monday from Florida's Cape Canaveral Air Force Station carrying 60 Starlink satellites. The Starlink constellation eventually will consist of thousands of satellites designed to provide worldwide high-speed Internet service. Paul Hennessy/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Hennessy/NurPhoto via Getty Images

As SpaceX Launches Dozens Of Satellites At A Time, Some Fear An Orbital Traffic Jam

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The planet Mercury is seen in silhouette (lower left) as it transits across the face of the sun on May 9, 2016. Another transit of Mercury — the last one for 30 years — will take place Monday. Bill Ingalls/AP hide caption

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Bill Ingalls/AP

The Peugeot SA lion logo sits on the front grille of an automobile on the forecourt of a PSA Peugeot Citroën new and used automobile showroom in Rodez, France, on Wednesday. Balint Porneczi/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Balint Porneczi/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Pakistani officials examine a train damaged by a fire in Liaquatpur, Pakistan, on Thursday. A massive fire engulfed three carriages of the train traveling in the country's eastern Punjab province. Siddique Baluch/AP hide caption

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Siddique Baluch/AP

John Witherspoon leaves a taping of The Late Show with David Letterman in New York in December 2009. Actor-comedian Witherspoon, who memorably played Ice Cube's father in the Friday films, has died at age 77. Charles Sykes/AP hide caption

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Charles Sykes/AP

Pope Francis lamented that the Latin name Archivium Secretum — of the Vatican Secret Archive originally meant to convey that the archive was private — had come to connote something more sinister. Giovanni Ciarlo/AP hide caption

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Giovanni Ciarlo/AP

Hong Kong activist Joshua Wong addresses the media during a news conference in Berlin last month. Wong on Tuesday said Hong Kong authorities have disqualified him from upcoming local council elections. Michael Sohn/AP hide caption

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Michael Sohn/AP

The U.S. Air Force's X-37B Orbital Test Vehicle Mission 5 is seen after landing at NASA's Kennedy Space Center Shuttle Landing Facility in Florida on Sunday. U.S. Air Force via Reuters hide caption

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U.S. Air Force via Reuters

Peronist presidential candidate Alberto Fernández and his running mate, former President Cristina Fernández de Kirchner, wave to supporters in Buenos Aires, Argentina, after incumbent President Mauricio Macri conceded defeat at the end of election day, on Sunday. Daniel Jayo/AP hide caption

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Daniel Jayo/AP

Indonesian Authorities Issue Report On Lion Air Crash

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Relatives of passengers of the crashed Lion Air jet check personal belongings retrieved from the waters where the airplane crashed, at Tanjung Priok Port in Jakarta, Indonesia, last October. Tatan Syuflana/AP hide caption

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Tatan Syuflana/AP