Scott Neuman Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features.
Stories By

Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman

Writer/Editor, Digital News

Scott Neuman is a reporter and editor, working mainly on breaking news for NPR's digital and radio platforms.

He brings to NPR years of experience as a journalist at a variety of news organizations based all over the world. He came to NPR from The Associated Press in Bangkok, Thailand, where he worked as an editor on the news agency's Asia Desk. Prior to that, Neuman worked in Hong Kong with The Wall Street Journal, where among other things he reported extensively from Pakistan in the wake of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. He also spent time with the AP in New York, and in India as a bureau chief for United Press International.

A native Hoosier, Neuman's roots in public radio (and the Midwest) run deep. He started his career at member station WBNI in Fort Wayne, and worked later in Illinois for WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford and WILL in Champaign-Urbana.

Neuman is a graduate of Purdue University. He lives with his wife, Noi, on the Chesapeake Bay in Maryland.

Story Archive

Tuesday

Rescue workers and volunteers conduct search and rescue operations in the rubble of a collapsed building in Diyarbakir, Turkey, after Monday's 7.8 magnitude earthquake. Ilyas Akengin/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ilyas Akengin/AFP via Getty Images

Wednesday

Vice President Harris (center) marches across the Edmund Pettus Bridge on March 6, 2022, in Selma, Ala., to commemorate the 57th anniversary of Bloody Sunday. Elijah Nouvelage/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Elijah Nouvelage/AFP via Getty Images

Monday

Friday

Players look on Monday as Damar Hamlin of the Buffalo Bills is treated by medical personnel at Paycor Stadium in Cincinnati, Ohio. Kirk Irwin/Getty Images hide caption

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Kirk Irwin/Getty Images

Saturday

Friday

Tuesday

A flight board shows canceled flights at the Southwest Airlines terminal at Los Angeles International Airport on Monday. Eugene Garcia/AP hide caption

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Eugene Garcia/AP

The blizzard is just one reason behind the operational meltdown at Southwest Airlines

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Monday

Sunday

A dozen Black men were convicted of murder by all-white juries in connection with the 1919 massacre in Elaine, Ark. Above, defendants S.A. Jones, Ed Hicks, Frank Hicks, Frank Moore, J.C. Knox, Ed Coleman and Paul Hall with their attorney at the state penitentiary in Little Rock in 1925 after the Supreme Court overturned their convictions. Butler Center for Arkansas Studies, Central Arkansas Library System hide caption

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Butler Center for Arkansas Studies, Central Arkansas Library System

Sunday

James Whitfield, former principal at Colleyville Heritage High School in Colleyville, Texas, in a photo taken at his home in Hurst, Texas, last year. Ben Torres for the Texas Tribune hide caption

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Ben Torres for the Texas Tribune

Sunday

A U-2 spy photo shows a medium-range ballistic missile base in San Cristobal, Cuba, with labels detailing various parts of the base in October 1962. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

Thursday

At night at Babcock Ranch, electricity generation switches from solar power to natural gas. Carlos Osorio for NPR hide caption

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Carlos Osorio for NPR

One Florida community built to weather hurricanes endured Ian with barely a scratch

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Tuesday

Humane Society Naples CEO Sarah Baeckler (center holding crate) helps load cats aboard a plane in Naples, Fla., on Monday. The group is getting ready for "an influx of surrendered animals" from Hurricane Ian, she says. Scott Neuman/NPR hide caption

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Scott Neuman/NPR

Hurricane Ian's havoc is forcing some Florida families to give up the family pet

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