Melissa Block As special correspondent, Melissa Block produces richly reported profiles of figures at the forefront of thought and culture, as well as stories and series on the critical issues of our day. In addition, she is a guest host on NPR news programs.
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Melissa Block 2016
Monika Evstatieva/NPR

Melissa Block

Special Correspondent and Host

As special correspondent, Melissa Block produces richly reported profiles of figures at the forefront of thought and culture, as well as stories and series on the critical issues of our day. Her reporting spans both domestic and international news. In addition, she is a guest host on NPR news programs.

Great reporting combined with compelling storytelling is vital to NPR's future. No one exemplifies that blend better than Block. As listeners well know, she has an amazing ability for telling the important stories of our age in a way that engages both the heart and the mind. It is why she has earned such a devoted following throughout her 30-year career at NPR.

As co-host of All Things Considered from 2003 to 2015, Block's reporting took her everywhere from the Gulf Coast in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina to the heart of Rio de Janeiro; from rural Mozambique to the farthest reaches of Alaska. Her riveting reporting from Sichuan, China, during and after the massive earthquake there in 2008 helped earn NPR broadcast journalism's top honors, including a George Foster Peabody Award, duPont-Columbia Award, Edward R. Murrow Award, National Headliner Award, and the Society of Professional Journalists' Sigma Delta Chi Award.

Block began at NPR in 1985 as an editorial assistant for All Things Considered and rose to become senior producer. From 1994 to 2002, she was a New York reporter and correspondent. Her reporting after the attacks of September 11, 2001, helped earn NPR a Peabody Award.

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Story Archive

Armando Hernandez prepares lunch orders at El Torito restaurant in Galax, Va. El Torito is one of several Mexican restaurants in town and the servers say that their clientele is predominantly white local residents. Madeline Gray for NPR hide caption

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Madeline Gray for NPR

Amid A Hispanic Boom, Conflicting Feelings On Immigration

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A Look At Immigration From A Virginia Town With A Fast-Growing Hispanic Population

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Robert Hartmann meets with his tutor, Sandy DeLuck, at the public library in Winterport, Maine. Hartmann reads at about a first-grade level. Melissa Block/NPR hide caption

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Casting Aside Shame And Stigma, Adults Tackle Struggles With Literacy

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Carmen strikes a pose for her younger sister, Evelyn, before homecoming in the fall of 2017. Couresy of the Schentrup family hide caption

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Couresy of the Schentrup family

After Daughter's 'Unimaginable' Death, Parkland Family Moved To Action

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Speedskaters Elise Christie of Great Britain gets by Kim Boutin of Canada and Andrea Keszler of Hungary as they fall during the Ladies' 500m quarterfinal on Feb. 13. "If the pass is gonna be close or tight," says U.S. speedskater J.R. Celski, "we usually say 'bombs,' like 'Uh-oh, something's gonna blow up!' So it's like an explosion. It most likely means people are falling." Richard Heathcote/Getty Images hide caption

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Richard Heathcote/Getty Images

From 'Bonk' To 'Bombs' And 'Fly Swat': A Guide To Olympic Slang

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Lindsey Vonn Wins Bronze In Downhill At Pyeongchang Winter Olympics

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Speedskating Primer: Long Track Vs. Short Track

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Skaters compete in the 1,500-meter women's short track. The ice for short track speedskating is thicker and warmer than long track ice. Hockey ice is warmer still. Amin Mohammad Jamali/Getty Images hide caption

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Amin Mohammad Jamali/Getty Images

The Experts Known As 'Ice Meisters' Create Perfect Olympic Skating Surfaces

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Figure Skater Yuzuru Hanyu Takes Another Gold

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News Brief: Florida School Shooting, Immigration Plans Stall, Olympics

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Olympics: U.S. Falls Behind In Skiing, Figure Skating

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For Some, Competing At The Olympics Runs In The Family

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Ashley Caldwell performs an aerial before the World Cup last February. When she watched aerials for the first time at age 12, she remembers thinking: "Why are these people so crazy?" Cameron Spencer/Getty Images hide caption

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Cameron Spencer/Getty Images

Aerials Skier Ashley Caldwell's 'Bold Move': A Quadruple-Twisting Triple Flip

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Maame Biney reacts after winning the women's 500-meter A final race during the U.S. Olympic short track speedskating trials in December. Rick Bowmer/AP hide caption

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Rick Bowmer/AP

Maame Biney Came To The U.S. From Ghana At 5. Now 18, She's A Team USA Speedskater

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