Melissa Block Melissa Block is a special correspondent and guest host of NPR's news programs.
Melissa Block at NPR- Vertical
Stories By

Melissa Block

Princess Margaret watches her older sister Princess Elizabeth make her first broadcast on Oct. 12, 1940 in London. Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Getty Images

'Ninety-Nine Glimpses Of Princess Margaret': A Woman Who Watched The Throne

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/641371322/642293127" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Armando Hernandez prepares lunch orders at El Torito restaurant in Galax, Va. El Torito is one of several Mexican restaurants in town and the servers say that their clientele is predominantly white local residents. Madeline Gray for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Madeline Gray for NPR

Amid A Hispanic Boom, Conflicting Feelings On Immigration

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/627251940/629588538" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A Look At Immigration From A Virginia Town With A Fast-Growing Hispanic Population

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/629631482/629651657" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Robert Hartmann meets with his tutor, Sandy DeLuck, at the public library in Winterport, Maine. Hartmann reads at about a first-grade level. Melissa Block/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Melissa Block/NPR

Casting Aside Shame And Stigma, Adults Tackle Struggles With Literacy

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/602797769/608583092" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Carmen strikes a pose for her younger sister, Evelyn, before homecoming in the fall of 2017. Couresy of the Schentrup family hide caption

toggle caption
Couresy of the Schentrup family

After Daughter's 'Unimaginable' Death, Parkland Family Moved To Action

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/593899288/594063017" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Speedskaters Elise Christie of Great Britain gets by Kim Boutin of Canada and Andrea Keszler of Hungary as they fall during the Ladies' 500m quarterfinal on Feb. 13. "If the pass is gonna be close or tight," says U.S. speedskater J.R. Celski, "we usually say 'bombs,' like 'Uh-oh, something's gonna blow up!' So it's like an explosion. It most likely means people are falling." Richard Heathcote/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Richard Heathcote/Getty Images

From 'Bonk' To 'Bombs' And 'Fly Swat': A Guide To Olympic Slang

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/587867730/588374762" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Lindsey Vonn Wins Bronze In Downhill At Pyeongchang Winter Olympics

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/587502669/587502670" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Speedskating Primer: Long Track Vs. Short Track

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/587195954/587195955" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Skaters compete in the 1,500-meter women's short track. The ice for short track speedskating is thicker and warmer than long track ice. Hockey ice is warmer still. Amin Mohammad Jamali/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Amin Mohammad Jamali/Getty Images

The Experts Known As 'Ice Meisters' Create Perfect Olympic Skating Surfaces

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/587044459/587121741" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Figure Skater Yuzuru Hanyu Takes Another Gold

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/586759909/586759910" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

News Brief: Florida School Shooting, Immigration Plans Stall, Olympics

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/586315508/586315509" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Olympics: U.S. Falls Behind In Skiing, Figure Skating

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/586315599/586315600" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

For Some, Competing At The Olympics Runs In The Family

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/586172088/586172091" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Ashley Caldwell performs an aerial before the World Cup last February. When she watched aerials for the first time at age 12, she remembers thinking: "Why are these people so crazy?" Cameron Spencer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Cameron Spencer/Getty Images

Aerials Skier Ashley Caldwell's 'Bold Move': A Quadruple-Twisting Triple Flip

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/582091144/585574423" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript