Shankar Vedantam Shankar Vedantam is a science correspondent for NPR.
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Shankar Vedantam 2017
Douglas Sonders/NPR

Shankar Vedantam

Correspondent, Science Desk

Shankar Vedantam is NPR's social science correspondent and the host of Hidden Brain. The focus of his reporting is on human behavior and the social sciences, and how research in those fields can get listeners to think about the news in unusual and interesting ways.

Before joining NPR in 2011, Vedantam spent 10 years as a reporter at The Washington Post. From 2007 to 2009, he was also a columnist, and wrote the Department of Human Behavior column for the Post. Vedantam writes an occasional column for Slate called "Hidden Brain."

Throughout his career, Vedantam has been recognized with many journalism honors including awards from the Society of Professional Journalists, the Pennsylvania Associated Press Managing Editors, the South Asian Journalists Association, the Asian American Journalists Association, the Pennsylvania Newspaper Association, and the American Public Health Association.

In 2009-2010, Vedantam served as a fellow at the Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard University. He participated in the 2005 Templeton-Cambridge Fellowship on Science and Religion, the 2003-2004 World Health Organization Journalism Fellowship, and the 2002-2003 Rosalynn Carter Mental Health Journalism Fellowship.

Vedantam is the author of the non-fiction book, The Hidden Brain: How our Unconscious Minds Elect Presidents, Control Markets, Wage Wars and Save Our Lives. The book, published in 2010, described how unconscious biases influence people.

Outside of journalism, Vedantam has written fiction and plays. His short story-collection, The Ghosts of Kashmir, was published in 2005. The previous year, the Brick Playhouse in Philadelphia produced his full-length, comedy play, Tom, Dick and Harriet.

Vedantam has served as a lecturer at many academic institutions including Harvard University and Columbia University. In 2010, he completed a two year-term as a senior scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington. Since 2006, he has served on the advisory board of the Templeton-Cambridge Fellowships in Science & Religion.

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Story Archive

Christie's exhibition space in King Street, London, United Kingdom. Exhibition of impressionists artworks in June 2014. Lionel Derimais/Getty Images hide caption

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Lionel Derimais/Getty Images

Researchers Explore Gender Disparities In The Art World

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Why are some warnings heard, while others are ignored? Angela Hsieh/NPR hide caption

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Angela Hsieh/NPR

The Cassandra Curse: Why We Heed Some Warnings, And Ignore Others

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Researchers say there's growing evidence that nature has a powerful effect on us, improving both our physical and psychological health. Angela Hsieh/NPR hide caption

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Angela Hsieh/NPR

Our Better Nature: How The Great Outdoors Can Improve Your Life

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Competition Fuels Schadenfreude, Research Shows

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Anthropologist David Graeber says there's a perverse logic that has allowed pointless jobs to proliferate in many workplaces. Yang Liu/Getty Images hide caption

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Yang Liu/Getty Images

BS Jobs: How Meaningless Work Wears Us Down

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On October 30, 1935, a Boeing plane known as the "flying fortress" crashed during a military demonstration in Ohio — shocking the aviation industry and prompting questions about the future of flight. National Archives hide caption

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National Archives

You 2.0: Check Yourself

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Researchers Examine What Social Isolation Can Do To Men's Health

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Even Thomas Edison got it wrong sometimes. In 1890, he marketed this creepy talking doll that was taken off the shelves after just a few weeks. Listen to its horrifying rendition of "Twinkle Twinkle Little Star." Collection of Robin and Joan Rolfs/Courtesy of Thomas Edison National Historical Park hide caption

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Collection of Robin and Joan Rolfs/Courtesy of Thomas Edison National Historical Park

You 2.0: Originals

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Social psychologist Eli Finkel says the way to improve marriage may be to expect less of it. Gary Waters/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Gary Waters/Getty Images/Ikon Images

You 2.0: When Did Marriage Become So Hard?

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Malte Mueller/Getty Images/fStop

You 2.0: Dream Jobs

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