Shankar Vedantam Shankar Vedantam is NPR's social science correspondent and the host of Hidden Brain.
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Shankar Vedantam

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Patty Ramge leans against her Ford Pinto in 1978. Since then, the car has become one of the most infamous vehicles in American history, known for a design that made it vulnerable in low-speed accidents. Bettmann/Bettmann Archive hide caption

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Bettmann/Bettmann Archive

Social psychologist Keith Payne says we have a bias toward comparing ourselves to people who have more than us, rather than those who have less Marcus Butt/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Derek Amato became a musical savant after a traumatic accident. Derek Amato hide caption

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Derek Amato

You 2.0: Fresh Starts

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A young Maya Shankar. Courtesy of Maya Shankar hide caption

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Courtesy of Maya Shankar
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'Hidden Brain': How Psychology Was Misused In Teen's Murder Case

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Actors reading during the recording of an episode of the radio soap opera "Musekeweya" in Kigali, produced by the NGO Radio La Benevolencija. Twice a week, people all around Rwanda gather in groups to listen together. Stephanie Aglietti/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Romeo & Juliet In Rwanda: How A Soap Opera Sought To Change A Nation

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At seventeen years old, Fred Clay was sentenced to prison for a crime he did not commit. Various flawed ideas in psychology were used to determine his guilt. Ken Richardson/Ken Richardson hide caption

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