Shankar Vedantam Shankar Vedantam is a science correspondent for NPR.

The program BAM (Becoming a Man) works with teenagers and uses cognitive behavior therapy to reduce violence in Chicago. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Chicago Leaders Use Cognitive Behavorial Therapy To Combat Violent Crime

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Comedian Maz Jobrani talks with us about President Trump, immigration, and finding humor in moments of political polarization. CBS Photo Archive/CBS via Getty Images hide caption

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CBS Photo Archive/CBS via Getty Images

Finding The Punchline: Maz Jobrani On Comedy In The Trump Era

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Does Studying Economics Make You Selfish?

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The program BAM (Becoming a Man) works with teenagers and uses cognitive behavior therapy to reduce violence in Chicago. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

On the Knife's Edge: Using Therapy To Address Violence Among Teens

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Cars are less likely to stop when people of color step into intersections, a study says. Andy Ryan/Getty Images hide caption

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Researchers Examine Race Factor In Car Crashes Involving Pedestrians

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Today's college students aren't necessarily having more sex than previous generations, but the culture that permeates hookups on campus has changed. Mark Peterson/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Peterson/Corbis via Getty Images

Hookup Culture: The Unspoken Rules Of Sex On College Campuses

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Research shows that financial analysts have biases in things like gender and names when it comes to evaluating companies. Saul Gravy/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Saul Gravy/Getty Images/Ikon Images

How Biases Affect Stock Analyst Predictions

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Illustration of Dr. J. Marion Sims with Anarcha by Robert Thom. Anarcha was subjected to 30 experimental surgeries. Pearson Museum, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine hide caption

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Pearson Museum, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine

Remembering Anarcha, Lucy, and Betsey: The Mothers of Modern Gynecology

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Research suggests that people just feel closer to those who are eating the same food as they do. Kathrin Ziegler/Getty Images hide caption

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Kathrin Ziegler/Getty Images

Why Eating The Same Food Increases People's Trust And Cooperation

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Barely a week after assuming office, President Donald Trump set off a worldwide firestorm when he decided to temporarily ban migrants from seven Muslim-majority countries and refugees from all over the world from entering the United States. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Fortress America: What We Can — And Can't — Learn From History

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When women express a lot of ambition in the workplace, research shows they pay a price. PeopleImages/Getty Images hide caption

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PeopleImages/Getty Images

Research Examines The Effects Of Gender On Stated Ambition

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Though Donald Trump's policies may not help his voters economically, sociologist Arlie Hochschild says he is speaking to them on a deeper level: meeting their emotional needs. MICHAEL MATHES/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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MICHAEL MATHES/AFP/Getty Images

Strangers in Their Own Land: The 'Deep Story' of Trump Supporters

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Kim Kardashian and Donald Trump exemplify our contradictory feelings about the rich and famous. As Hidden Brain explores this week, we idolize the powerful, but also relish their downfall. D Dipasupil/WireImage hide caption

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D Dipasupil/WireImage

Coronations, Coups, And Keeping Up With The Kardashians

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Kim Kardashian and Donald Trump exemplify our contradictory feelings about the rich and famous. We idolize the powerful, but also relish their downfall. D Dipasupil/WireImage hide caption

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D Dipasupil/WireImage

Researchers Unravel Strange And Contradictory Feelings About Power

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Instead of cars terrorizing people, one researcher is asking whether people might be terrorizing self-driving cars. Noah Berger/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Noah Berger/AFP/Getty Images

Humans Worry About Self-Driving Cars. Maybe It Should Be The Reverse

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