Shankar Vedantam Shankar Vedantam is a science correspondent for NPR.
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Shankar Vedantam 2017
Douglas Sonders/NPR

Shankar Vedantam

Correspondent, Science Desk

Shankar Vedantam is NPR's social science correspondent and the host of Hidden Brain. The focus of his reporting is on human behavior and the social sciences, and how research in those fields can get listeners to think about the news in unusual and interesting ways.

Before joining NPR in 2011, Vedantam spent 10 years as a reporter at The Washington Post. From 2007 to 2009, he was also a columnist, and wrote the Department of Human Behavior column for the Post. Vedantam writes an occasional column for Slate called "Hidden Brain."

Throughout his career, Vedantam has been recognized with many journalism honors including awards from the Society of Professional Journalists, the Pennsylvania Associated Press Managing Editors, the South Asian Journalists Association, the Asian American Journalists Association, the Pennsylvania Newspaper Association, and the American Public Health Association.

In 2009-2010, Vedantam served as a fellow at the Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard University. He participated in the 2005 Templeton-Cambridge Fellowship on Science and Religion, the 2003-2004 World Health Organization Journalism Fellowship, and the 2002-2003 Rosalynn Carter Mental Health Journalism Fellowship.

Vedantam is the author of the non-fiction book, The Hidden Brain: How our Unconscious Minds Elect Presidents, Control Markets, Wage Wars and Save Our Lives. The book, published in 2010, described how unconscious biases influence people.

Outside of journalism, Vedantam has written fiction and plays. His short story-collection, The Ghosts of Kashmir, was published in 2005. The previous year, the Brick Playhouse in Philadelphia produced his full-length, comedy play, Tom, Dick and Harriet.

Vedantam has served as a lecturer at many academic institutions including Harvard University and Columbia University. In 2010, he completed a two year-term as a senior scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington. Since 2006, he has served on the advisory board of the Templeton-Cambridge Fellowships in Science & Religion.

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Hidden Brain: A Study Of Airline Delays

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Sociologist Brooke Harrington says "the lives of the richest people in the world are so different from those of the rest of us, it's almost literally unimaginable." erhui1979/Getty Images hide caption

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What's It Like To Be Rich? Ask The People Who Manage Billionaires' Money

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When Did Marriage Become So Hard?

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Jana Mestecky (left) poses for a cast photo during production of the play 'Des rats et des hommes,' directed by Israel Horovitz (front, third from left). The photo appeared in the French magazine, L'Avant-Scene in 1994. Mestecky is one of many women who have come forward accusing Israel Horovitz of sexual harassment and assault. Courtesy of Jana Mestecky hide caption

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Why #MeToo Happened In 2017

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Jana Mestecky (left) poses for a cast photo during production of the play 'Des rats et des hommes,' directed by Israel Horovitz (front, third from left). The photo appeared in the French magazine, L'Avant-Scene in 1994. Mestecky is one of many women who have come forward accusing Israel Horovitz of sexual harassment and assault. Courtesy of Jana Mestecky hide caption

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Courtesy of Jana Mestecky

The Psychological Forces Behind A Cultural Reckoning: Understanding #MeToo

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Your Team Made It To The Super Bowl. Now Maybe It's Time For Flu Shot.

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Lost In Translation: The Power Of Language To Shape How We View The World

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Hidden Brain: Researchers Delve Into Improving Concentration

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Kim Kardashian and Donald Trump exemplify our contradictory feelings about the rich and famous. As Hidden Brain explores this week, we idolize the powerful, but also relish their downfall. D Dipasupil/WireImage hide caption

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The Power Hour

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Alan Alda Wants Us To Have Better Conversations

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A century ago, many new immigrants to the United States ended up returning home. And it often took a while for those who stayed to learn English and integrate into American society. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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The Huddled Masses And The Myth Of America

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Study: Great Recession Led To Fewer Deaths

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It may feel like political divisions are deeper than ever before. But historian David Moss argues our democracy has been tested many times — and has proven resilient. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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American Democracy: "Productive Conflict," Or A Dumpster Fire?

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Courtesy of Maya Shankar

Radio Replay: Fresh Starts

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Our Mental Space, Under Attack

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