Robert Benincasa Robert Benincasa is a computer-assisted reporting producer in NPR's Investigations Unit.
Stories By

Robert Benincasa

Robert Benincasa

Producer, Investigations Unit

Robert Benincasa is a computer-assisted reporting producer in NPR's Investigations Unit.

Since joining NPR in 2008, Benincasa has been reporting on NPR Investigations stories, analyzing data for investigations, and developing data visualizations and interactive applications for NPR.org. He has worked on numerous groundbreaking stories, including data-driven investigations of the inequities of federal disaster aid and coal miners' exposures to deadly silica dust.

Prior to NPR, Benincasa served as the database editor for the Gannett News Service Washington Bureau for a decade.

Benincasa's work at NPR has been recognized by many of journalism's top honors. In 2014, he was part of a team that won an Investigative Reporters & Editors Award, and he shared Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Awards with Investigations Unit colleagues in 2016 and 2011.

Also in 2011, he received numerous accolades for his contributions to several investigative stories, including an Edward R. Murrow Award for Excellence in Coverage of Trauma, an Investigative Reporters & Editors Radio Award, the White House News Photographers Association's Eyes of History Award for multimedia innovation, and George Polk and George Foster Peabody awards.

Benincasa served on the faculty of Georgetown University's Master of Professional Studies program in journalism from 2008 to 2016.

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

New Flood Control Systems Could Make New Jersey Town Too Pricey For Current Residents

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/700873488/700873517" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

New Jersey's Lost Valley Tells The Story Of Government Home Buyouts

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/700625573/700625574" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A home in the Lost Valley area of Manville, N.J. The numbers spray-painted on the front of the house indicate that it was bought as part of a federal disaster program. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Claire Harbage/NPR

A boy rides his bike through still water after a thunderstorm in the Lakewood area of East Houston, which flooded during Hurricane Harvey. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Claire Harbage/NPR

How Federal Disaster Money Favors The Rich

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/688786177/700512141" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

"There's a lot of memories here, some good, some bad," says Smith, while reflecting on his years working at the now defunct Solid Energy mine in Pike County. Rich-Joseph Facun for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Rich-Joseph Facun for NPR

An Epidemic Is Killing Thousands Of Coal Miners. Regulators Could Have Stopped It

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/675253856/677895083" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Cellos are lined up backstage at the Chicago Symphony Orchestra before a Nov. 8 rehearsal of Schubert's Ninth Symphony. The CITES Rosewood regulations have made some musicians apprehensive about taking instruments containing the wood across international borders. Meg Anderson/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Meg Anderson/NPR

The Tree That Rocked The Music Industry

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/566927001/567404327" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Role The Judiciary Played In The Rally In Charlottesville, Va.

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/544974504/544978999" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Ed Howard, an attorney specializing in consumer issues, and his sister had trouble obtaining price information while trying to plan their father's funeral. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ariel Zambelich/NPR

Despite Decades-Old Law, Funeral Prices Are Still Unclear

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/504031472/514049794" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Ellen Bethea and her great-grandson, Lucas, look at a painting of her late husband, Archie. Laura Heald for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Laura Heald for NPR

You Could Pay Thousands Less For A Funeral Just By Crossing The Street

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/504020003/513957984" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Marian Grunwald (from left), Earl Elfstrom and Verna Matheson bounced a balloon back and forth with nursing assistant Rick Pavlisich on Dec. 13, 2013, at an Ecumen nursing home in Chisago City, Minn. Glen Stubbe/Star Tribune, Minneapolis St. Paul hide caption

toggle caption
Glen Stubbe/Star Tribune, Minneapolis St. Paul

This Nursing Home Calms Troubling Behavior Without Risky Drugs

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/368539057/369667374" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

NPR's analysis of government data found that harsh penalties are almost never used when nursing home residents get unnecessary drugs of any kind. Owen Franken/Corbis hide caption

toggle caption
Owen Franken/Corbis

Nursing Homes Rarely Penalized For Oversedating Patients

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/368538773/369536841" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Antipsychotic drugs aren't necessary in the vast majority of dementia cases, gerontologists say. The pills can be stupefying and greatly raise the risk of falls — and hip fracture. iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption
iStockphoto

Old And Overmedicated: The Real Drug Problem In Nursing Homes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/368524824/369276355" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Jim Justice owns Southern Coal Corp., which has 71 mines that have racked up thousands of violations and millions of dollars in fines. Scott Halleran/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Scott Halleran/Getty Images

Billionaire Spent Millions In Charity, But Avoided Mine Fines

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/363024382/364355135" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript