Robert Benincasa Robert Benincasa is a computer-assisted reporting producer in NPR's Investigations Unit.
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Robert Benincasa

Robert Benincasa

Producer, Investigations Unit

Robert Benincasa is a computer-assisted reporting producer in NPR's Investigations Unit.

Since joining NPR in 2008, Benincasa has been reporting on NPR Investigations stories, analyzing data for investigations, and developing data visualizations and interactive applications for NPR.org. He has worked on numerous groundbreaking stories, including data-driven investigations of the inequities of federal disaster aid and coal miners' exposures to deadly silica dust.

Prior to NPR, Benincasa served as the database editor for the Gannett News Service Washington Bureau for a decade.

Benincasa's work at NPR has been recognized by many of journalism's top honors. In 2014, he was part of a team that won an Investigative Reporters & Editors Award, and he shared Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Awards with Investigations Unit colleagues in 2016 and 2011.

Also in 2011, he received numerous accolades for his contributions to several investigative stories, including an Edward R. Murrow Award for Excellence in Coverage of Trauma, an Investigative Reporters & Editors Radio Award, the White House News Photographers Association's Eyes of History Award for multimedia innovation, and George Polk and George Foster Peabody awards.

Benincasa served on the faculty of Georgetown University's Master of Professional Studies program in journalism from 2008 to 2016.

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Rep. James E. Clyburn, D-S.C., has asked Trump administration officials to account for how and why they selected particular companies to provide personal protective equipment. Sarah Silbiger/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah Silbiger/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Gov. Jim Justice, W.Va., waves to the crowd at his annual State of the State speech on Jan. 9, 2019, in Charleston, W.Va. Tyler Evert/AP hide caption

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Tyler Evert/AP

Data Raises Questions About Who Benefited From PPP Loans

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Jovita Carranza, Administrator of the Small Business Administration, testifies during a Senate Small Business and Entrepreneurship hearing June 10, 2020, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Kevin Dietsch/AP hide caption

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Kevin Dietsch/AP

NPR reviewed a database of thousands of contracting actions connected to the COVID-19 public health crisis and identified more than 250 companies that got federal contracts worth more than $1 million without going through a fully competitive bidding process. diane555/Getty Images hide caption

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Feds Spend Billions On COVID-19 Contracts, Often Without Fully Competitive Bidding

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Daniel Wood/NPR

Traffic Is Way Down Because Of Lockdown, But Air Pollution? Not So Much

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As part of a demonstration across from the White House on May 7, National Nurses United set out empty shoes for nurses who have died from COVID-19. The union is asking employers and the government to provide safe workplaces, including adequate staffing. Hospitals have been laying off and furloughing nurses due to lost revenue. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

As Hospitals Lose Revenue, More Than A Million Health Care Workers Lose Jobs

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Emergency medical workers transport a patient at the Cobble Hill Health Center on April 18, 2020, in Brooklyn, New York. The nursing home has had at least 55 COVID-19 reported deaths. Justin Heiman/Getty Images hide caption

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In New York Nursing Homes, Death Comes To Facilities With More People Of Color

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Jovita Carranza, head of the Small Business Administration, addresses the press earlier this month at the White House, as Vice President Pence and President Trump listen. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

President Trump speaks during a news conference about the coronavirus pandemic in the Rose Garden of the White House on March 13. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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A Month After Emergency Declaration, Trump's Promises Largely Unfulfilled

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West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice delivers his annual State of the State address at the state Capitol in Charleston, W.Va., in January. Justice and his family own coal mining companies that have agreed to pay the government more than $5 million in delinquent mine safety fines, the Justice Department says. Chris Jackson/AP hide caption

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Chris Jackson/AP

ICU capabilities vary not only from hospital to hospital, but also from region to region. Some parts of the country have far more critical care beds by population than others. Ryan McVay/Getty Images hide caption

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ICU Bed Capacity Varies Widely Nationwide

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Peggy Gibson sits in her living room with her service dog, Rocky, in West Jefferson, N.C., last November. Gibson says Rocky, a diabetic alert dog, isn't able to work well in public. Mike Belleme for NPR hide caption

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Mike Belleme for NPR

The Hope And Hype Of Diabetic Alert Dogs

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A luthier assembles the rosewood sides of a guitar at C.F. Martin & Co. in Nazareth, Pa. Instrument-makers and musicians will likely be able to transport instruments containing rosewood around the world without a burdensome permit process. Jacqueline Larma/AP hide caption

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Jacqueline Larma/AP