Robert Benincasa Robert Benincasa is a computer-assisted reporting producer in NPR's Investigations Unit.
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Robert Benincasa

Robert Benincasa

Producer, Investigations Unit

Robert Benincasa is a computer-assisted reporting producer in NPR's Investigations Unit.

Since joining NPR in 2008, Benincasa has been reporting on NPR Investigations stories, analyzing data for investigations, and developing data visualizations and interactive applications for NPR.org. He has worked on numerous groundbreaking stories, including data-driven investigations of the inequities of federal disaster aid and coal miners' exposures to deadly silica dust.

Prior to NPR, Benincasa served as the database editor for the Gannett News Service Washington Bureau for a decade.

Benincasa's work at NPR has been recognized by many of journalism's top honors. In 2014, he was part of a team that won an Investigative Reporters & Editors Award, and he shared Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Awards with Investigations Unit colleagues in 2016 and 2011.

Also in 2011, he received numerous accolades for his contributions to several investigative stories, including an Edward R. Murrow Award for Excellence in Coverage of Trauma, an Investigative Reporters & Editors Radio Award, the White House News Photographers Association's Eyes of History Award for multimedia innovation, and George Polk and George Foster Peabody awards.

Benincasa served on the faculty of Georgetown University's Master of Professional Studies program in journalism from 2008 to 2016.

Story Archive

FTC Chairperson Lina Khan, speaking at a Senate Committee hearing in 2021. Last week, the FTC moved closer to modernizing a rule that requires funeral businesses to provide prices to consumers when they visit or call. SAUL LOEB/AP hide caption

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SAUL LOEB/AP

Mike Noel at the Heritage Plantation community, June 8, 2022. Noel retired and bought a home in the mobile home park and looked forward to fishing in the ocean 20 minutes away. "I thought I was moving to paradise," he says. Eva Marie Uzcategui for NPR hide caption

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Eva Marie Uzcategui for NPR

From floods to slime: Mobile home residents say landlords make millions, neglect them

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Contractors work on the roof of a house under construction in Louisville, Ky. A new study shows the U.S. is 3.8 million homes short of meeting housing needs. Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images

There's a massive housing shortage across the U.S. Here's how bad it is where you live

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A new study provides the first evidence of its kind that silica dust is responsible for the rising tide of severe black lung disease, including among coal miners in Appalachia. Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images

"I could be out next week without a place to live," Mary Hunt worried when an NPR reporter visited. Hunt doesn't own the piece of land, making Havenpark Communities free to tell her to get out. Elaine Cromie for NPR hide caption

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Elaine Cromie for NPR

How the government helps investors buy mobile home parks, raise rent and evict people

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Cruz Urias Beltran collapsed because of heat-related illness while working in a cornfield near Grand Island, Neb., in 2018. He is one of at least 384 workers who died from environmental heat exposure in the U.S. in the last decade, according to an investigation by Columbia Journalism Investigations and NPR. Walker Pickering for NPR hide caption

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Walker Pickering for NPR

Heat is killing workers in the U.S. — and there are no federal rules to protect them

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Landfills produce a lot of methane, a heat-trapping gas that contributes to global warming. With scientists calling for cuts in methane emissions, there are challenges to curbing these emissions from landfills, starting with even quantifying them. Pictured here is Waste Management landfill in Livermore, Calif. Michael Macor/San Francisco Chronicle via Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Macor/San Francisco Chronicle via Getty Images

Your Trash Is Emitting Methane In The Landfill. Here's Why It Matters For The Climate

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Police hold a perimeter near the White House as demonstrators gather to protest police brutality in the morning hours of May 31 in Washington, D.C. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Rep. James E. Clyburn, D-S.C., has asked Trump administration officials to account for how and why they selected particular companies to provide personal protective equipment. Sarah Silbiger/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah Silbiger/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Gov. Jim Justice, W.Va., waves to the crowd at his annual State of the State speech on Jan. 9, 2019, in Charleston, W.Va. Tyler Evert/AP hide caption

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Tyler Evert/AP

Data Raises Questions About Who Benefited From PPP Loans

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Jovita Carranza, Administrator of the Small Business Administration, testifies during a Senate Small Business and Entrepreneurship hearing June 10, 2020, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Kevin Dietsch/AP hide caption

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Kevin Dietsch/AP

NPR reviewed a database of thousands of contracting actions connected to the COVID-19 public health crisis and identified more than 250 companies that got federal contracts worth more than $1 million without going through a fully competitive bidding process. diane555/Getty Images hide caption

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Feds Spend Billions On COVID-19 Contracts, Often Without Fully Competitive Bidding

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Daniel Wood/NPR

Traffic Is Way Down Because Of Lockdown, But Air Pollution? Not So Much

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As part of a demonstration across from the White House on May 7, National Nurses United set out empty shoes for nurses who have died from COVID-19. The union is asking employers and the government to provide safe workplaces, including adequate staffing. Hospitals have been laying off and furloughing nurses due to lost revenue. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

As Hospitals Lose Revenue, More Than A Million Health Care Workers Lose Jobs

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