Graham Smith Graham Smith is a Senior Producer on NPR's Investigations team.
Graham Smith
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Graham Smith

Graham Smith

Senior Producer, Investigations

Graham Smith is a Senior Producer on NPR's Investigations team and winner of the 2021 Pulitzer Prize for audio reporting. He works with staffers, station reporters and independent journalists to dig deep and create sound-rich, long-form stories and series.

Smith came to NPR in 2003 and spent five years as Supervising Senior Producer of All Things Considered, responsible for the daily running of the show. He's field produced and reported from conflict zones for the international desk, and served as an editor on Morning Edition. He's also taught field production and radio skills to reporters making the transition to audio storytelling. Smith has recorded hosts and athletes skiing at Olympic venues, sought shrimp in the wake of Hurricane Katrina and lost his lunch flying with U.S. Marines on their controversial Osprey tilt-rotor aircraft. He has a deep love for meaningful obituaries.

Smith won the 2021 Pulitzer Prize for the podcast series No Compromise, which explores an extreme faction within the gun-rights movement. He was also named a Pulitzer finalist in 2020 for his work on White Lies, an investigation into a Civil Rights era murder and what it tells us about America today.

His collaborations with Youth Radio earned him the Robert F. Kennedy and the Edward R. Murrow awards for a story on a culture of harassment at a Navy base, and the George Foster Peabody award for editing a series on teen sex trafficking in Oakland. He also received Murrow awards for his own battlefield reporting from Afghanistan, and another as part of NPR's team covering the Ebola epidemic in Sierra Leone.

Smith came to D.C. from WBUR Boston, NH Public Radio and Monitor Radio. He and family keep bees and raise crops at their little urban homestead, carving out time to walk in nature and play music.

Story Archive

U.S. Army and Navy combat veteran Bryan Stern sorts out logistics on the phone for evacuations in Kyiv, Ukraine, last month. Stern runs a nonprofit organization called Project Dynamo that extracts people from hostile places. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Meet the rescue team extracting people trapped in Kyiv suburbs under siege

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A nurse administers a shot to a patient. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Fighting to survive: Ukraine's cancer patients' struggle to find care while fleeing

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Tuesday's funeral procession ends at the gravesites where soldiers Viktor Dudar, 44, and Ivan Koverznev, 24, will be buried as priests say their blessings and mourners look on. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Hundreds gather to honor fallen Ukrainian soldiers

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Ukrainians are on alert for Russian saboteurs trying to infiltrate their towns

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A closer look at the volunteers who are signing up to fight the Russians

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As many people flee Ukraine, others are traveling to the embattled country

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Signs are displayed in the window of a store in Grosse Pointe Woods, Mich. The Paycheck Protection Program, aimed at helping small businesses survive the coronavirus crisis, has been beset by problems. Paul Sancya/AP hide caption

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Paul Sancya/AP

President Trump signs the Paycheck Protection Program and Health Care Enhancement Act last week. The law added billions for loans for small businesses through the PPP. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

Loopholes In Small Business Relief Program Allow Thriving Companies To Cash In

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A Bank of America sign is displayed at a branch in New York on April 10, 2020. Mark Kauzlarich/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Kauzlarich/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Small Business Rescue Earned Banks $10 Billion In Fees

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President Trump speaks during a news conference about the coronavirus pandemic in the Rose Garden of the White House on March 13. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

A Month After Emergency Declaration, Trump's Promises Largely Unfulfilled

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William Portwood, who died less than two weeks after NPR confirmed his involvement in the 1965 murder of Boston minister James Reeb, poses for a photograph in front of his home in Selma, Ala. Chip Brantley/NPR hide caption

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Chip Brantley/NPR

NPR Identifies 4th Attacker In Civil Rights-Era Cold Case

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Abu Bakarr Koroma is part of a condom handout program to prevent HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases. These days, he can't even give 'em away. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

The Prostitutes Are Not Happy. Neither Are Brides. Sex, Love And Ebola

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On Lumley Beach, after day trippers have headed home, prostitutes look for customers along a 100-yard stretch of road near some of the nicer hotels as well as near the bars and restaurants along the beachfront. Simon Akam/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Simon Akam/Reuters/Landov