Ann Powers Ann Powers is NPR Music's critic and correspondent. She writes for NPR's music news blog, The Record, and can be heard on NPR's newsmagazines and music programs.
Ann Powers
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Ann Powers

Ann Powers
Mito Habe-Evans/NPR

Ann Powers

Critic and Correspondent, NPR Music

Ann Powers is NPR Music's critic and correspondent. She writes for NPR's music news blog, The Record, and she can be heard on NPR's newsmagazines and music programs.

One of the nation's most notable music critics, Powers has been writing for The Record, NPR's blog about finding, making, buying, sharing and talking about music, since April 2011.

Powers served as chief pop music critic at the Los Angeles Times from 2006 until she joined NPR. Prior to the Los Angeles Times, she was senior critic at Blender and senior curator at Experience Music Project. From 1997 to 2001 Powers was a pop critic at The New York Times and before that worked as a senior editor at the Village Voice. Powers began her career working as an editor and columnist at San Francisco Weekly.

Her writing extends beyond blogs, magazines and newspapers. Powers co-wrote Tori Amos: Piece By Piece, with Amos, which was published in 2005. In 1999, Power's book Weird Like Us: My Bohemian America was published. She was the editor, with Evelyn McDonnell, of the 1995 book Rock She Wrote: Women Write About Rock, Rap, and Pop and the editor of Best Music Writing 2010.

After earning a Bachelor of Arts degree in creative writing from San Francisco State University, Powers went on to receive a Master of Arts degree in English from the University of California.

Story Archive

Doechii's she / her / black bitch tops our shortlist of the best new releases out on Aug. 5. Chris Parsons/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Chris Parsons/Courtesy of the artist

New Music Friday: The best releases out on Aug. 5

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Renaissance, Beyoncé's seventh full-length solo album, mines a liberating history of dance music, from Donna Summer-sampling disco to modern Chicago house. Carlijn Jacobs/Via Parkwood Entertainment hide caption

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Carlijn Jacobs/Via Parkwood Entertainment

Beyoncé's long-awaited seventh solo album, Act I Renaissance, is due out Friday, July 29. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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The power of Beyoncé is about to change music... again

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From top left, clockwise: The Suffers, GIVĒON, Saya Gray, Petrol Girls, Regina Spektor,. Courtesy of the artists hide caption

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Courtesy of the artists

NPR's favorite music of June, from salty joy to heart-wrenching slow jams

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Megan Thee Stallion, performing at Glastonbury Festival in Somerset, U.K. on Sat. June 25, 2022. During her set, Megan spoke out against the Supreme Court's decision overturning Roe v. Wade. Ben Birchall/PA Images via Getty Images hide caption

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Ben Birchall/PA Images via Getty Images

Norah Jones in a 2002 portrait to promote Come Away With Me. Lourdes Delgado hide caption

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Lourdes Delgado

Norah Jones reflects on 20 years of 'Come Away With Me'

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From left to right, clockwise: Pusha T, Myra Melford, Syd, Horace Andy, Straw Man Army. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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NPR's favorite music of April, from broken-hearted R&B to paranoid post-punk

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The songs made by Wet Leg, fronted by Rhian Teasdale (left) and Hester Chambers sound like they come from nowhere, and also everywhere. Hollie Fernando/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Hollie Fernando/Courtesy of the artist