Dan Charles Dan Charles is NPR's food and agriculture correspondent.
Maggie Starbard/NPR
Dan Charles
Maggie Starbard/NPR

Dan Charles

Correspondent, Food and Agriculture

Dan Charles is NPR's food and agriculture correspondent.

Primarily responsible for covering farming and the food industry, Charles focuses on the stories of culture, business, and the science behind what arrives on your dinner plate.

This is his second time working for NPR; from 1993 to 1999, Charles was a technology correspondent at NPR. He returned in 2011.

During his time away from NPR, Charles was an independent writer and radio producer and occasionally filled in at NPR on the Science and National desks, and at Weekend Edition. Over the course of his career Charles has reported on software engineers in India, fertilizer use in China, dengue fever in Peru, alternative medicine in Germany, and efforts to turn around a troubled school in Washington, DC.

In 2009-2010, he taught journalism in Ukraine through the Fulbright program. He has been guest researcher at the Institute for Peace Research and Security Policy at the University of Hamburg, Germany, and a Knight Science Journalism fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

From 1990 to 1993, Charles was a U.S. correspondent for New Scientist, a major British science magazine.

The author of two books, Charles wrote Master Mind: The Rise and Fall of Fritz Haber, The Nobel Laureate Who Launched the Age of Chemical Warfare (Ecco, 2005) and Lords of the Harvest: Biotech, Big Money, and the Future of Food (Perseus, 2001) about the making of genetically engineered crops.

Charles graduated magna cum laude from American University with a degree in economics and international affairs. After graduation Charles spent a year studying in Bonn, which was then part of West Germany, through the German Academic Exchange Service.

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Story Archive

These soybeans were damaged in 2017 by dicamba, a popular weedkiller that's prone to drifting into neighboring fields. Some farmers in the state are defying efforts by regulators to strictly limit use of the chemical. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Despite A Ban, Arkansas Farmers Are Still Spraying Controversial Weedkiller

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The edges of this sycamore leaf are turned upward into a cuplike shape, the typical sign of exposure to dicamba. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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A Drifting Weedkiller Puts Prized Trees At Risk

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News Brief: Kavanaugh Hearing Still Set For Monday, Public Health Effects Of Hurricane

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A flooded farm stands next to the Lumber River on Monday in this aerial photograph taken after Hurricane Florence hit Lumberton, N.C. Charles Mostoller/Bloomberg /Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Florence Engulfs Hog Farms And Chicken Houses, Thrashing North Carolina Agriculture

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Manure lagoons on hog farms like this one in eastern North Carolina flooded after Hurricane Floyd swept through in 1999, creating environmental and health concerns for nearby rivers. Farmers are worried that the scenario will repeat after Hurricane Florence hits this week. John Althouse/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Hog Farmers Scramble to Drain Waste Pools Ahead Of Hurricane Florence

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The Sahara desert creeps up on a palm field. Fadel Senna /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Fadel Senna /AFP/Getty Images

A Scientist Dreams Up A Plan To Stop The Sahara From Expanding

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The Food and Drug Administration quickly identified romaine lettuce as the source of a months-long outbreak, but the foodborne illness investigation has been one of the agency's most complicated in years. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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What Sparked An E. Coli Outbreak In Lettuce? Scientists Trace A Surprising Source

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Terminally Ill Man Awarded $289 Million In Lawsuit Against Monsanto

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Renters' Movement Presses Cities For More Housing Development

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A New Look At An Old Way To Store Energy

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Georgia's chicken prices were 30 to 50 percent higher than chicken prices elsewhere in 2015. Investors smelled a rat. Rob Lawson/Getty Images hide caption

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How Wall Street Brought Down Georgia's Suspicious Chicken Price Index

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