Dan Charles Dan Charles is NPR's food and agriculture correspondent.
Dan Charles
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Dan Charles

Maggie Starbard/NPR
Dan Charles
Maggie Starbard/NPR

Dan Charles

Correspondent, Food and Agriculture

Dan Charles is NPR's food and agriculture correspondent.

Primarily responsible for covering farming and the food industry, Charles focuses on the stories of culture, business, and the science behind what arrives on your dinner plate.

This is his second time working for NPR; from 1993 to 1999, Charles was a technology correspondent at NPR. He returned in 2011.

During his time away from NPR, Charles was an independent writer and radio producer and occasionally filled in at NPR on the Science and National desks, and at Weekend Edition. Over the course of his career Charles has reported on software engineers in India, fertilizer use in China, dengue fever in Peru, alternative medicine in Germany, and efforts to turn around a troubled school in Washington, DC.

In 2009-2010, he taught journalism in Ukraine through the Fulbright program. He has been guest researcher at the Institute for Peace Research and Security Policy at the University of Hamburg, Germany, and a Knight Science Journalism fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

From 1990 to 1993, Charles was a U.S. correspondent for New Scientist, a major British science magazine.

The author of two books, Charles wrote Master Mind: The Rise and Fall of Fritz Haber, The Nobel Laureate Who Launched the Age of Chemical Warfare (Ecco, 2005) and Lords of the Harvest: Biotech, Big Money, and the Future of Food (Perseus, 2001) about the making of genetically engineered crops.

Charles graduated magna cum laude from American University with a degree in economics and international affairs. After graduation Charles spent a year studying in Bonn, which was then part of West Germany, through the German Academic Exchange Service.

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Story Archive

Flora Dillard says the help she received in upgrading her house and cutting her energy bills is "a very good program, especially for people that don't have a lot of income." She has lived in the house for 15 years. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

What's The Best Way To Help The Climate And People, Too? Home Improvement

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A few years ago Cleveland linked climate policy and social equity. Now the Ohio city is hoping to use federal funding to help achieve its climate action goals. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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The White House Wants To Fight Climate Change And Help People. Cleveland Led The Way

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Cindy Mumford and her neighbors are working with several organizations in Cleveland, gathering support and financing to get a community solar project up and running. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Cleveland - What Climate Equity Could Look Like

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Wind-blown soil fills a ditch between a road and the fields of Gunsmoke Farms, a large organic farm northwest of Pierre, S.D., in early March. Stringer hide caption

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A Giant Organic Farm Faces Criticism That It's Harming The Environment

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This Brooklyn building is going green--Dan Charles has tips on how to make one's home more environmentally friendly. Dan Charles hide caption

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Dan Charles

Life Kit: Green Living

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Curtis Wynn, president and CEO of Roanoke Electric Cooperative, with a bi-directional charger that can use electricity from an electric vehicle's battery to power a building. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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How A New Deal Legacy Is Building Clean Energy In Rural North Carolina

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North Carolina Electric Cooperative Aims To Make New Technologies Accessible To All

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A gas ring on a household stove powered by natural gas is seen alight. In many states across the US, efforts to limit natural gas are being stymied by legislation. Christopher Furlong/Getty Images hide caption

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The Fight Over The Future Of Natural Gas

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A windfarm near Velva, North Dakota. Two counties in the state have enacted drastic restrictions on new wind projects in an attempt to save coal mining jobs, despite protests from landowners who'd like to rent their land to wind energy companies. Karen Bleier/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Karen Bleier/AFP via Getty Images

North Dakota Officials Block Wind Power In Effort To Save Coal

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Soil on hilltops in this photo is lighter in color, revealing a loss of fertile topsoil. Evan Thaler for NPR hide caption

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New Evidence Shows Fertile Soil Gone From Midwestern Farms

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