Dan Charles Dan Charles is NPR's food and agriculture correspondent.
Dan Charles
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Dan Charles

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Dan Charles
Maggie Starbard/NPR

Dan Charles

Correspondent, Food and Agriculture

Dan Charles is NPR's food and agriculture correspondent.

Primarily responsible for covering farming and the food industry, Charles focuses on the stories of culture, business, and the science behind what arrives on your dinner plate.

This is his second time working for NPR; from 1993 to 1999, Charles was a technology correspondent at NPR. He returned in 2011.

During his time away from NPR, Charles was an independent writer and radio producer and occasionally filled in at NPR on the Science and National desks, and at Weekend Edition. Over the course of his career Charles has reported on software engineers in India, fertilizer use in China, dengue fever in Peru, alternative medicine in Germany, and efforts to turn around a troubled school in Washington, DC.

In 2009-2010, he taught journalism in Ukraine through the Fulbright program. He has been guest researcher at the Institute for Peace Research and Security Policy at the University of Hamburg, Germany, and a Knight Science Journalism fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

From 1990 to 1993, Charles was a U.S. correspondent for New Scientist, a major British science magazine.

The author of two books, Charles wrote Master Mind: The Rise and Fall of Fritz Haber, The Nobel Laureate Who Launched the Age of Chemical Warfare (Ecco, 2005) and Lords of the Harvest: Biotech, Big Money, and the Future of Food (Perseus, 2001) about the making of genetically engineered crops.

Charles graduated magna cum laude from American University with a degree in economics and international affairs. After graduation Charles spent a year studying in Bonn, which was then part of West Germany, through the German Academic Exchange Service.

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Story Archive

A Colombian worker checks the plastic protection cover over a banana bunch on a plantation in Aracataca, Colombia. A dreaded fungus that has destroyed banana plantations in Asia has now spread to Latin America. Jan Sochor/LatinContent via Getty Images hide caption

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Jan Sochor/LatinContent via Getty Images

Devastating Banana Fungus Arrives In Colombia, Threatening The Fruit's Future

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Pigs are seen in a hog pen in Linquan county in central China's Anhui province in July. The number of pigs in China is falling rapidly due to an epidemic of African Swine Fever. Barcroft Media/Barcroft Media via Getty Images hide caption

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Swine Fever Is Killing Vast Numbers Of Pigs In China

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Why Utility Companies Are Key To Slowing Climate Change

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Experts On Climate Change Say How We Use Land To Grow Food Needs To Change

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U.N. Says Agriculture Must Change To Prevent Worst Effects Of Climate Change

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Honeybees are seen feeding on the honeydew of whiteflies in citrus trees. Traces of neonicotinoids, a family of pesticides, have shown up in honeydew, an important food source for other insects. Alejandro Tena hide caption

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Alejandro Tena

Cattle graze in pasture formed by cleared rainforest land in Pará, Brazil. A new online tool makes it easier for food companies to detect this kind of land-clearing by their suppliers. Education Images/Universal Images Group via Getty Images hide caption

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Education Images/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Don't Cut Those Trees — Big Food Might Be Watching

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A worker at the port in Nantong, in China's eastern Jiangsu province, displays soybeans imported from Ukraine. Imports of soybeans from the U.S., once China's biggest supplier, have dropped massively since a trade war between the U.S. and China began in 2018. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Charles/NPR

As Climate Changes, Taxpayers Will Shoulder Larger U.S. Payouts To Farmers

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Pengyin Chen, professor of soybean breeding and genetics at the University of Missouri, in his test plots of soybeans near the town of Portageville. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Rogue Weedkiller Vapors Are Threatening Soybean Science

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Emissions rise from the Duke Energy coal-fired Asheville Power Plant ahead of Hurricane Florence in Arden, N.C., in September 2018. Regulators are supposed to make sure Duke Energy delivers reliable power at the lowest possible cost — and that's always been interpreted as cost to the consumer, not cost to the environment. Charles Mostoller/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Charles Mostoller/Bloomberg via Getty Images

North Carolina Tries To Clean Up Its Electricity

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Why Food Reformers Have Mixed Feelings About Eco-Labels

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John Draper pours glyphosate into the tank of his sprayer at the University of Maryland's Wye Research and Education Center. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Safe Or Scary? The Shifting Reputation Of Glyphosate, AKA Roundup

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