Dan Charles Dan Charles is NPR's food and agriculture correspondent.
Dan Charles
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Dan Charles

Maggie Starbard/NPR
Dan Charles
Maggie Starbard/NPR

Dan Charles

Correspondent, Food and Agriculture

Dan Charles is NPR's food and agriculture correspondent.

Primarily responsible for covering farming and the food industry, Charles focuses on the stories of culture, business, and the science behind what arrives on your dinner plate.

This is his second time working for NPR; from 1993 to 1999, Charles was a technology correspondent at NPR. He returned in 2011.

During his time away from NPR, Charles was an independent writer and radio producer and occasionally filled in at NPR on the Science and National desks, and at Weekend Edition. Over the course of his career Charles has reported on software engineers in India, fertilizer use in China, dengue fever in Peru, alternative medicine in Germany, and efforts to turn around a troubled school in Washington, DC.

In 2009-2010, he taught journalism in Ukraine through the Fulbright program. He has been guest researcher at the Institute for Peace Research and Security Policy at the University of Hamburg, Germany, and a Knight Science Journalism fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

From 1990 to 1993, Charles was a U.S. correspondent for New Scientist, a major British science magazine.

The author of two books, Charles wrote Master Mind: The Rise and Fall of Fritz Haber, The Nobel Laureate Who Launched the Age of Chemical Warfare (Ecco, 2005) and Lords of the Harvest: Biotech, Big Money, and the Future of Food (Perseus, 2001) about the making of genetically engineered crops.

Charles graduated magna cum laude from American University with a degree in economics and international affairs. After graduation Charles spent a year studying in Bonn, which was then part of West Germany, through the German Academic Exchange Service.

Story Archive

World leaders commit to ambitious goals at U.N. climate summit

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Climate negotiations at COP26 center on timeline and aid to developing countries

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Negotiators are in the home stretch on the final day of UN climate conference

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As climate talks come to a close, not all the countries there are on the same page

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A stacker-reclaimer next to a stockpile of coal at the Newcastle Coal Terminal in Newcastle, New South Wales. Australia is a major coal producer. A new draft agreement at the climate summit in Scotland calls for ending coal power. Brendon Thorne/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Brendon Thorne/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Participants are in the so-called "action zone" at the UN Climate Change Conference COP26 in Glasgow. Christoph Soeder/Getty Images hide caption

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Christoph Soeder/Getty Images

Halfway through COP26, here's what has happened so far and what lies ahead

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Smoke rises from a brick kiln on the outskirts of Gauhati, India, in 2015. India's pledge this week to reach net zero carbon emissions by 2070 factors into a new, more optimistic, analysis by the International Energy Agency on climate change goals. Anupam Nath/AP hide caption

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Anupam Nath/AP

Biden administration proposes rules to cut climate-warming methane emissions

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World leaders are gathering in Scotland for the U.N. Climate Summit

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'We're not where we need to be,' says U.N. climate chief

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A lot is riding on the COP26 global climate summit, but broken promises stall change

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