Dan Charles Dan Charles is NPR's food and agriculture correspondent.

Arkansas farmer David Wildy inspects a field of soybeans that were damaged by dicamba. The pesticide ban is tied up in courts, leaving farmers uncertain about what to plant. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Deb Gangwish inspects soil on her farm near Shelton, Neb. Dan Charles hide caption

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Dan Charles

A Grass-Roots Movement For Healthy Soil Spreads Among Farmers

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A cow at Carol and Bill Schuler's dairy farm in southwest Michigan. Dan Charles hide caption

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Dan Charles

When Robots Milk Cows, Farm Families Taste Freedom

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Carrageenan is an extract derived from seaweeds like these harvested off Hingutanan Island, Bien Unido, Bohol, Philippines. Farley Baricuatro/Getty Images hide caption

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Farley Baricuatro/Getty Images

Cameras and claws are the machine's version of human eyes and hands. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Robots Are Trying To Pick Strawberries. So Far, They're Not Very Good At It

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Underwater grasses and a crab pot near Crisfield, Md. In the Chesapeake Bay, underwater seagrass beds are growing, sheltering crabs and fish. The long-awaited recovery depends on efforts by farmers to prevent nutrients from polluting the giant estuary. Peter Essick/Getty Images/Aurora Creative hide caption

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Peter Essick/Getty Images/Aurora Creative

The idea behind the blended beef-mushroom burger is that mixing chopped mushrooms into our burgers boosts the umami taste, adds more moisture and reduces the amount of beef needed. And reducing the need for beef has a big impact on the environment. The Mushroom Council hide caption

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The Mushroom Council

The Food and Drug Administration has started testing randomly selected fresh herbs and prepared guacamole. So far, the agency has found dangerous bacteria in 3 percent to 6 percent of the samples it tested. Joff Lee/Getty Images hide caption

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Joff Lee/Getty Images

A global map showing where all fishing vessels were active during 2016. Dark circles show the vessels avoiding exclusive economic zones around islands, where they aren't allowed. Global Fishing Watch hide caption

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Global Fishing Watch

Ray Vester served on the Arkansas State Plant Board for 18 years. "It's self-governing, by the people, for the people," he says. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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These Citizen-Regulators In Arkansas Defied Monsanto. Now They're Under Attack

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Rebecka Ortiz offers her daughter a pasta sample at the store where she was using her food stamps to stock up on food for her family in Woonsocket, R.I. The Trump administration is proposing drastic changes in the "food stamp" program, now called SNAP. People getting that aid would lose much of their ability to choose the food they buy. Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Nigel Raine keeps a collection of wild bees in his laboratory at the University of Guelph, in Canada. Farmed honeybees can compete with wild bees for food, making it harder for wild species to survive. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Honeybees Help Farmers, But They Don't Help The Environment

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Microorganisms play a vital role in growing food and sustaining the planet, but they do it anonymously. Scientists haven't identified most soil microbes, but they are learning which are most common. PeopleImages/Getty Images hide caption

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PeopleImages/Getty Images

Scientists Peek Inside The 'Black Box' Of Soil Microbes To Learn Their Secrets

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An engineer shows a sample of biodiesel at an industrial complex in General Lagos, Santa Fe province, Argentina. The United States recently imposed duties on Argentine biodiesel, blocking it from the U.S. market. Eitan Abramovich/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Eitan Abramovich/AFP/Getty Images