Dan Charles Dan Charles is NPR's food and agriculture correspondent.
Dan Charles
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Dan Charles

Maggie Starbard/NPR
Dan Charles
Maggie Starbard/NPR

Dan Charles

Correspondent, Food and Agriculture

Dan Charles is NPR's food and agriculture correspondent.

Primarily responsible for covering farming and the food industry, Charles focuses on the stories of culture, business, and the science behind what arrives on your dinner plate.

This is his second time working for NPR; from 1993 to 1999, Charles was a technology correspondent at NPR. He returned in 2011.

During his time away from NPR, Charles was an independent writer and radio producer and occasionally filled in at NPR on the Science and National desks, and at Weekend Edition. Over the course of his career Charles has reported on software engineers in India, fertilizer use in China, dengue fever in Peru, alternative medicine in Germany, and efforts to turn around a troubled school in Washington, DC.

In 2009-2010, he taught journalism in Ukraine through the Fulbright program. He has been guest researcher at the Institute for Peace Research and Security Policy at the University of Hamburg, Germany, and a Knight Science Journalism fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

From 1990 to 1993, Charles was a U.S. correspondent for New Scientist, a major British science magazine.

The author of two books, Charles wrote Master Mind: The Rise and Fall of Fritz Haber, The Nobel Laureate Who Launched the Age of Chemical Warfare (Ecco, 2005) and Lords of the Harvest: Biotech, Big Money, and the Future of Food (Perseus, 2001) about the making of genetically engineered crops.

Charles graduated magna cum laude from American University with a degree in economics and international affairs. After graduation Charles spent a year studying in Bonn, which was then part of West Germany, through the German Academic Exchange Service.

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Story Archive

Farmers work during a harvest in Jutland, Denmark. People keep worrying about food shortages. Some economists say the fears actually create their own problems. Nick Brundle Photography/Getty Images hide caption

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Nick Brundle Photography/Getty Images

Food Is Growing More Plentiful, So Why Do People Keep Warning Of Shortages?

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Satellite Images Show Who's To Blame For Most Of The Deforestation In Brazil

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Prairie strips in fields of corn or soybeans can protect the soil and allow wildlife to flourish. This strip was established in a field near Traer, Iowa, in 2015. Omar de Kok-Mercado, Iowa State University hide caption

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Omar de Kok-Mercado, Iowa State University

How Absentee Landowners Keep Farmers From Protecting Water And Soil

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Absentee Landlords Interfere With Farmers Protecting Water, Soil

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Bayer Agrees To Settle Thousands Of Lawsuits Filed Over Its Weed Killer

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Tyson tested every worker at about 20 of its plants, including this one in Logansport, Ind., after workers got sick. The company is now considering ongoing random testing to try to keep outbreaks from flaring. Darron Cummings/AP hide caption

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Darron Cummings/AP

How Widespread Coronavirus Testing Helped Meatpacking Plants Slow Outbreaks

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Court Ruling On Popular Weedkiller Dicamba Upends Midwestern Agriculture

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People load their vehicles with boxes of food at a Los Angeles Regional Food Bank earlier this month in Los Angeles. Food banks across the United States are seeing numbers and people they have never seen before amid unprecedented unemployment from the COVID-19 outbreak. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Food Banks Get The Love, But SNAP Does More To Fight Hunger

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Food Banks Say SNAP Is A Better Way To Get Food To People

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A Van Warns Farmworkers In Florida About The Coronavirus

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Coronavirus Updates: Protecting Workers During And After The Pandemic

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Listener Questions On How The Coronavirus Affects The Food Supply Chain

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