Dan Charles Dan Charles is NPR's food and agriculture correspondent.
Dan Charles
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Dan Charles

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Dan Charles
Maggie Starbard/NPR

Dan Charles

Correspondent, Food and Agriculture

Dan Charles is NPR's food and agriculture correspondent.

Primarily responsible for covering farming and the food industry, Charles focuses on the stories of culture, business, and the science behind what arrives on your dinner plate.

This is his second time working for NPR; from 1993 to 1999, Charles was a technology correspondent at NPR. He returned in 2011.

During his time away from NPR, Charles was an independent writer and radio producer and occasionally filled in at NPR on the Science and National desks, and at Weekend Edition. Over the course of his career Charles has reported on software engineers in India, fertilizer use in China, dengue fever in Peru, alternative medicine in Germany, and efforts to turn around a troubled school in Washington, DC.

In 2009-2010, he taught journalism in Ukraine through the Fulbright program. He has been guest researcher at the Institute for Peace Research and Security Policy at the University of Hamburg, Germany, and a Knight Science Journalism fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

From 1990 to 1993, Charles was a U.S. correspondent for New Scientist, a major British science magazine.

The author of two books, Charles wrote Master Mind: The Rise and Fall of Fritz Haber, The Nobel Laureate Who Launched the Age of Chemical Warfare (Ecco, 2005) and Lords of the Harvest: Biotech, Big Money, and the Future of Food (Perseus, 2001) about the making of genetically engineered crops.

Charles graduated magna cum laude from American University with a degree in economics and international affairs. After graduation Charles spent a year studying in Bonn, which was then part of West Germany, through the German Academic Exchange Service.

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Story Archive

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Curtis Wynn, president and CEO of Roanoke Electric Cooperative, with a bi-directional charger that can use electricity from an electric vehicle's battery to power a building. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

How A New Deal Legacy Is Building Clean Energy In Rural North Carolina

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North Carolina Electric Cooperative Aims To Make New Technologies Accessible To All

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A gas ring on a household stove powered by natural gas is seen alight. In many states across the US, efforts to limit natural gas are being stymied by legislation. Christopher Furlong/Getty Images hide caption

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Christopher Furlong/Getty Images

The Fight Over The Future Of Natural Gas

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A windfarm near Velva, North Dakota. Two counties in the state have enacted drastic restrictions on new wind projects in an attempt to save coal mining jobs, despite protests from landowners who'd like to rent their land to wind energy companies. Karen Bleier/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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North Dakota Officials Block Wind Power In Effort To Save Coal

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Soil on hilltops in this photo is lighter in color, revealing a loss of fertile topsoil. Evan Thaler for NPR hide caption

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Evan Thaler for NPR

New Evidence Shows Fertile Soil Gone From Midwestern Farms

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Cities' Goal To Lower Climate Emissions Could Be Blocked By Gas Utilities

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Tyler Hollon, who works for a construction company in Utah, says eliminating natural gas from apartment buildings can reduce costs. Hollon's company now shares its designs and budgets with other builders. "The reason we're giving it away is to clean up the air," Hollon says. "We want everybody to do it. It's everybody's air that we're all breathing. Makes my mountain bike ride that much easier." Kim Raff for NPR hide caption

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Kim Raff for NPR

As Cities Grapple With Climate Change, Gas Utilities Fight To Stay In Business

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Deforested land on Indonesia's Borneo Island. Activists are using satellites to monitor deforestation, but cloud cover sometimes hides it from view. Bay Ismoyo/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Bay Ismoyo/AFP via Getty Images

Pillagers Of Tropical Forests Can't Hide Behind Clouds Anymore

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Bath County Pumped Storage Station Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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The World's Biggest Battery (Classic)

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USDA/ARS

Pesticide warning sign in an orange grove. This sign, bilingual in English and Spanish, warns that the poisonous pesticide Lorsban has been applied to these orange trees. Photographed in Woodlake, in the San Joaquin Valley, California, USA. Jim West/Science Source hide caption

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Jim West/Science Source

Ron Rosmann, seen in 2011, received some of the subsidies but says he's not in favor of the program. "It has disproportionately gone to the largest producers," he says. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Farmers Got A Government Bailout In 2020, Even Those Who Didn't Need It

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