Dan Charles Dan Charles is NPR's food and agriculture correspondent.
Dan Charles
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Dan Charles

Maggie Starbard/NPR
Dan Charles
Maggie Starbard/NPR

Dan Charles

Correspondent, Food and Agriculture

Dan Charles is NPR's food and agriculture correspondent.

Primarily responsible for covering farming and the food industry, Charles focuses on the stories of culture, business, and the science behind what arrives on your dinner plate.

This is his second time working for NPR; from 1993 to 1999, Charles was a technology correspondent at NPR. He returned in 2011.

During his time away from NPR, Charles was an independent writer and radio producer and occasionally filled in at NPR on the Science and National desks, and at Weekend Edition. Over the course of his career Charles has reported on software engineers in India, fertilizer use in China, dengue fever in Peru, alternative medicine in Germany, and efforts to turn around a troubled school in Washington, DC.

In 2009-2010, he taught journalism in Ukraine through the Fulbright program. He has been guest researcher at the Institute for Peace Research and Security Policy at the University of Hamburg, Germany, and a Knight Science Journalism fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

From 1990 to 1993, Charles was a U.S. correspondent for New Scientist, a major British science magazine.

The author of two books, Charles wrote Master Mind: The Rise and Fall of Fritz Haber, The Nobel Laureate Who Launched the Age of Chemical Warfare (Ecco, 2005) and Lords of the Harvest: Biotech, Big Money, and the Future of Food (Perseus, 2001) about the making of genetically engineered crops.

Charles graduated magna cum laude from American University with a degree in economics and international affairs. After graduation Charles spent a year studying in Bonn, which was then part of West Germany, through the German Academic Exchange Service.

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Story Archive

Tyson Foods says it has suspended operations at its pork plant in Columbus Junction, Iowa, pictured in February 2013, after more than two dozen workers got sick with COVID-19. Ryan J. Foley/AP hide caption

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Ryan J. Foley/AP

Medical staff in Marseille, France show packets of a Nivaquine, tablets containing chloroquine and Plaqueril, tablets containing hydroxychloroquine. Gerard Julien/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Gerard Julien/AFP via Getty Images

Together Inc. food bank workers distribute food at a drive-through location in Omaha, Neb., last week. Disruptions in the agricultural supply chain caused by the coronavirus pandemic are making it difficult for food banks. Nati Harnik/AP hide caption

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Nati Harnik/AP

Medical staff move bodies from the Wyckoff Heights Medical Center in Brooklyn, N.Y., Thursday to a refrigerated truck. Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images

Dr. Deborah Birx, White House coronavirus response coordinator, discussed one of the models used to estimate potential deaths from coronavirus in U.S. during a briefing Tuesday. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Workers pick apples in a Wapato, Wash., orchard last October. U.S. farms employ hundreds of thousands of seasonal workers, mostly from Mexico, who enter the country on H-2A visas. The potential impact of the coronavirus on seasonal workers has the food industry on edge. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

COVID-19 Threatens Food Supply Chain As Farms Worry About Workers Falling Ill

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The Biofuel Requirement Of American Gasoline Hits A Roadblock

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Nutrient-deficient grass could be leading to a decline in the number of grasshoppers, according to a new study. Savushkin/Getty Images hide caption

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Savushkin/Getty Images

Why Taller Grass Can Be Bad News For Grasshoppers

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Lindsey Balbierz for NPR

How To Read Food Labels, From Free-Range To Fair Trade

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Soybean plants grow in a field near Tiskilwa, Ill. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

An Airbnb For Farmland Hits A Snag, As Farmers Raise Data Privacy Concerns

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Bayer And BASF Ordered To Pay Missouri Farmer Over $250 Million In Herbicide Case

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Methuselah, the first date palm tree grown from ancient seeds, in a photo taken in 2008. Guy Eisner hide caption

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Guy Eisner

Dates Like Jesus Ate? Scientists Revive Ancient Trees From 2,000-Year-Old Seeds

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