Dan Charles Dan Charles is NPR's food and agriculture correspondent.
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Zurich is expanding its district heating system, which delivers hot water and steam through underground pipes. With more buildings relying on this system for heat, there's less demand for natural gas. City of Zurich hide caption

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City of Zurich

To fight climate change, and now Russia, too, Zurich turns off natural gas

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A car gets towed while people walk in the flooded waters of Telephone Rd. in Houston, Texas on August 30, 2017. THOMAS SHEA/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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THOMAS SHEA/AFP via Getty Images

Dairy farms that capture methane from their cows' manure can earn valuable pollution-cutting credits through California's Low Carbon Fuel Standard. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

How dairy farmers are cashing in on California's push for cleaner fuel

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Flared natural gas is burned off at a natural gas plant. Methane, the main ingredient in natural gas, can leak from natural gas plants and pipelines. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

A satellite finds massive methane leaks from gas pipelines

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Eric Balken in part of Glen Canyon. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Megadrought fuels debate over whether a flooded canyon should reemerge

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Exercise, such as cycling, can help treat patients with Parkinson's disease. PHILIPPE HUGUEN/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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PHILIPPE HUGUEN/AFP via Getty Images

Placebos Vs Parkinson's: The Power Of Joy

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Picture of a sign warning about the presence of hippos in a neighborhood in Colombia, near the Hacienda Napoles theme park, once the private zoo of drug kingpin Pablo Escobar. RAUL ARBOLEDA/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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RAUL ARBOLEDA/AFP via Getty Images

The driver of an electric car handles the charging cable to charge the car at a public charging station in Berlin, Germany. Carsten Koall/Getty Images hide caption

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Carsten Koall/Getty Images

President Biden signs the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, part of Biden's climate plans, in November on the South Lawn at the White House. Kenny Holston/Getty Images hide caption

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Kenny Holston/Getty Images

With the loss of Manchin's vote, Biden's climate change agenda may be doomed

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Cattle graze on land burned and deforested by cattle farmers near Novo Progresso, Para state, Brazil. Brazil is among the nations that have signed a pledge to protect forests. Andre Penner/AP hide caption

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Andre Penner/AP

Most nations are promising to end deforestation, but skeptics want proof

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Scientists are working to figure out how climate change influences tornadoes

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Activists protesting "greenwashing," in which a company or government appears to do more for the environment than it is, gather outside the JP Morgan premises near the COP26 U.N. Climate Summit. Alastair Grant/AP hide caption

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Alastair Grant/AP

Carbon trading gets a green light from the U.N., and Brazil hopes to earn billions

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World leaders commit to ambitious goals at U.N. climate summit

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Climate negotiations at COP26 center on timeline and aid to developing countries

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