Elise Hu Elise Hu is NPR's Seoul correspondent.
Jake Holt
Elise Hu
Jake Holt

Elise Hu

International Correspondent, Seoul, South Korea

Elise Hu is an award-winning correspondent assigned to NPR's newest international bureau, in Seoul, South Korea. She's responsible for covering geopolitics, business and life in both Koreas and Japan. She previously covered the intersection of technology and culture for the network's on-air, online and multimedia platforms.

Hu joined NPR in 2011 to coordinate the digital development and editorial vision for the StateImpact network, a state government reporting project focused on member stations.

Before joining NPR, she was one of the founding reporters at The Texas Tribune, a non-profit digital news startup devoted to politics and public policy. While at the Tribune, Hu oversaw television partnerships and multimedia projects; contributed to The New York Times' expanded Texas coverage and pushed for editorial innovation across platforms.

An honors graduate of the University of Missouri-Columbia's School of Journalism, she previously worked as the state political reporter for KVUE-TV in Austin, WYFF-TV in Greenville, SC, and reported from Asia for the Taipei Times.

Her work has earned a Gannett Foundation Award for Innovation in Watchdog Journalism, a National Edward R. Murrow award for best online video, beat reporting awards from the Texas Associated Press and The Austin Chronicle once dubiously named her the "Best TV Reporter Who Can Write."

Outside of work, Hu has taught digital journalism at Northwestern University and Georgetown University's journalism schools and serves as a guest co-host for TWIT.tv's program, Tech News Today. She's also an adviser to the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, where she keeps up with emerging media and technology as a panelist for the Knight News Challenge.

Elise Hu can be reached by e-mail at ehu (at) npr (dot) org as well as via the social media links, above.

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Story Archive

Takashi Yanaoka, president of the Musashigaoka Golf Course outside Tokyo, says tee times are booked at about 90 percent here. But it bucks an industry-wide downward trend. Becky Sullivan/NPR hide caption

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Becky Sullivan/NPR

Japan Has Half Of Asia's Golf Courses, But The Game's Popularity There Is Flagging

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In the last week, five women have come forward with accusations of sexual misconduct by Alabama Republican candidate for U.S. Senate Judge Roy Moore. Jonathan Bachman/Getty Images hide caption

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Why Some Survivors Of Sexual Harassment And Assault Wait To Tell Their Stories

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A "comfort woman" statue is placed on a bus seat to mark the 5th International Memorial Day for Comfort Women in Seoul in August. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

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Ahn Young-joon/AP

'Comfort Woman' Memorial Statues, A Thorn In Japan's Side, Now Sit On Korean Buses

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Last summer, South Koreans left messages of their sexual harassment and assaults on Post-it notes at an exit of Gangnam subway station. Jung Yeon-je/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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As President Trump arrived to speak to South Korea's general assembly he was greeted by many demonstrators. On the streets of Seoul, demonstrations were divided between those who didn't want Trump to visit at all and a few thousand American-flag-waving South Koreans who gave him an enthusiastic welcome. Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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South Korea's Far-Right Gives Trump The Warmest Welcome

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President Trump, standing with his wife, Melania, and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, speaks Monday in Tokyo at a meeting with the families of Japanese citizens abducted by North Korea. At center rear is Koichiro Iizuka, whose mother, Yaeko Taguchi, was abducted by North Korean agents in 1978. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Families Of Japanese Abducted By North Korea Hope For Help From Trump

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Japanese Prime Minister and ruling party president Shinzo Abe smiles after the general election Sunday in Tokyo in which his ruling party won a clear majority. The Asahi Shimbun/The Asahi Shimbun via Getty Images hide caption

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The Asahi Shimbun/The Asahi Shimbun via Getty Images

Japan's Prime Minister Isn't Popular, But His Coalition Won A Supermajority

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Japanese Voters Weather Typhoon To Vote In Presidential Election

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Tokyo Governor Yuriko Koike greets supporters in the rain during a campaign stop in the Shibuya district last Friday. John Matthews/for NPR hide caption

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John Matthews/for NPR

Tokyo Governor Hopes Her New 'Party Of Hope' Will Shake Up Japanese Politics

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South Korea has the worst air pollution among the developed nations in the the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Armed With NASA Data, South Korea Confronts Its Choking Smog

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TV screens at a store in Seoul, South Korea, show news coverage of the latest exchange of insults between President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

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Ahn Young-joon/AP

Pedestrians walk in front of a large video screen in Tokyo broadcasting a news report about North Korea's latest missile test that passed over Japan early Friday morning. Toru Yamanaka /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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North Korea Fires Another Missile Over Japan

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