Elise Hu Elise Hu is NPR's Seoul correspondent.
Jake Holt
Elise Hu
Jake Holt

Elise Hu

International Correspondent, Seoul, South Korea

Elise Hu is an award-winning correspondent assigned to NPR's newest international bureau, in Seoul, South Korea. She's responsible for covering geopolitics, business and life in both Koreas and Japan. She previously covered the intersection of technology and culture for the network's on-air, online and multimedia platforms.

Hu joined NPR in 2011 to coordinate the digital development and editorial vision for the StateImpact network, a state government reporting project focused on member stations.

Before joining NPR, she was one of the founding reporters at The Texas Tribune, a non-profit digital news startup devoted to politics and public policy. While at the Tribune, Hu oversaw television partnerships and multimedia projects; contributed to The New York Times' expanded Texas coverage and pushed for editorial innovation across platforms.

An honors graduate of the University of Missouri-Columbia's School of Journalism, she previously worked as the state political reporter for KVUE-TV in Austin, WYFF-TV in Greenville, SC, and reported from Asia for the Taipei Times.

Her work has earned a Gannett Foundation Award for Innovation in Watchdog Journalism, a National Edward R. Murrow award for best online video, beat reporting awards from the Texas Associated Press and The Austin Chronicle once dubiously named her the "Best TV Reporter Who Can Write."

Outside of work, Hu has taught digital journalism at Northwestern University and Georgetown University's journalism schools and serves as a guest co-host for TWIT.tv's program, Tech News Today. She's also an adviser to the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, where she keeps up with emerging media and technology as a panelist for the Knight News Challenge.

Elise Hu can be reached by e-mail at ehu (at) npr (dot) org as well as via the social media links, above.

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Story Archive

South Korean protesters burn a portrait of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in front of Seoul Station on Monday. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

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Ahn Young-joon/AP

In South Korea, A Backlash Against Olympics Cooperation With The North

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Ryom Tae Ok and Kim Ju Sik of North Korea perform during their pairs short program in Oberstdorf, Germany, in September. Christof Stache/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Christof Stache/AFP/Getty Images

North Korea's Olympic Hopefuls Include A Pair Of Figure Skaters

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North And South Korea Find Common Ground For Pyeongchang Winter Olympics

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South Korean Unification Minister Cho Myung-gyun (left) shakes hands with North Korean chief delegate Ri Son Gwon after their meeting Tuesday at the village of Panmunjom in the Demilitarized Zone dividing the two countries. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

North And South Korea Reach Breakthroughs In First High-Level Talks In 2 Years

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At Korea Talks, Pyongyang Agrees To Send Athletes To Winter Olympics

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A South Korean government official checks the hotline to talk with the North Korean side at the border village of Panmunjom on January 3. South Korea says North Korea has agreed to meet at the village next week. Handout from South Korean government/Getty Images hide caption

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Handout from South Korean government/Getty Images

North And South Korea Plan First Talks In 2 Years

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North Korea Responsible For 'WannaCry' Ransomware Attack, U.S. Says

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Secretary of State Rex Tillerson waits to speak at the 2017 Atlantic Council-Korea Foundation Forum in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday. He told the audience the U.S. shouldn't require North Korea to promise to give up its nuclear weapons as a condition of holding talks. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Tillerson's North Korean Overture Highlights His Credibility Problem

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Talks With North Korea Could Begin Without Conditions, Tillerson Says

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News Brief: North Korea Fires ICBM, Republican Tax Plan Gains Support, CFPB

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Worldwide there are more than 30 million people living with HIV/AIDs. Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images hide caption

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Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images

How One Pop-Up Restaurant Is Fighting Stigma Against HIV/AIDS

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Lawmakers in the Kumamoto Municipal Assembly talk with member Yuka Ogata, who brought her infant son to work. The Asahi Shimbun/The Asahi Shimbun via Getty Imag hide caption

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The Asahi Shimbun/The Asahi Shimbun via Getty Imag

Japanese Lawmaker's Baby Gets Booted From The Floor

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'The End We Start From' Chronicles Motherhood In The Midst Of Crisis

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