Bill Chappell Bill Chappell is a writer and producer who currently works on NPR's Newsdesk, in the heart of the newroom. In the past, he has worked with Morning Edition, Fresh Air, and other shows.

Bill Chappell

Reporter, Producer

Bill Chappell is a writer and producer on the Newsdesk, in the heart of NPR's newsroom in Washington, D.C.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to being the lead writer and editor for online coverage of several Olympic Games, from London 2012 to Pyeongchang 2018. His assignments have included being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as establishing the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR.org.

In the past, Chappell has edited and coordinated digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, in addition to editing the rundown of All Things Considered. He frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as All Tech Considered and The Salt.

In 2009, Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that redesigned NPR's web site. One year later, NPR.org won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to use digital tools to tell compelling stories, in addition to "evangelizing" — promoting more collaboration between legacy and digital departments.

Prior to joining NPR, Chappell was part of the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and coordinating CNN's pool coverage on major events.

Chappell's work for CNN included editing digital video and producing web stories for SI.com. He also edited and produced stories for CNN.com's features division.

Before joining CNN, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, Chappell attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

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Story Archive

Darwin Mejia, 7, saw his mother for the first time early Friday, reuniting with Beata Mariana de Jesus Mejia-Mejia at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport after they were separated at the border by U.S. agents. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

U.S.-made bourbon whiskey is now under a 25 percent tariff in the European Union, in retaliation for the Trump administration's tariffs on steel and aluminum. Stefano Rellandini/Reuters hide caption

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Stefano Rellandini/Reuters

EU Tariffs Take Effect, Retaliating For Trump's Tariffs On Steel And Aluminum

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Shuttered businesses and abandoned buildings are a common sight in the southwestern Pennsylvania town of Brownsville. Pennsylvania is one of 26 states with an increasing mortality rate among whites. Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Sara Netanyahu, wife of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (left), is charged with fraud and breach of trust over her ordering of food from pricey restaurants for private meals. Brendan McDermid/Reuters hide caption

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Brendan McDermid/Reuters

Koko, the gorilla who became an ambassador to the human world through her ability to communicate, has died. She's seen here at age 4, telling psychologist Francine "Penny" Patterson (left) that she is hungry. In the center is June Monroe, an interpreter for the deaf at St. Luke's Church, who helped teach Koko. Bettmann Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Bettmann Archive/Getty Images

Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen, the face of the Trump administration's policy that has split up migrant families, was heckled inside a Mexican restaurant. She's seen here at Monday's daily briefing at the White House. Leah Millis/Reuters hide caption

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Leah Millis/Reuters

Charleston's City Council approved a resolution apologizing for its "role in regulating, supporting and fostering slavery and the resulting atrocities inflicted" as a result. Tuesday's vote took place in Charleston's City Hall — which was built by slaves. Bruce Smith/AP hide caption

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Bruce Smith/AP

Canada's House of Commons voted to legalize recreational marijuana use, sending the bill to the Senate. In this photo from April 20, smoke rises during the annual 4/20 marijuana rally on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Ontario. Chris Wattie/Reuters hide caption

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Chris Wattie/Reuters

A federal judge says that Kansas' strict voter registration law is unconstitutional — and she also criticized Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, who represented his office in defending the law. Mitchell Willetts/AP hide caption

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Mitchell Willetts/AP

Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen takes questions from reporters at the White House on Monday. She acknowledged that the Trump administration changed the way it is enforcing immigration law, resulting in separation of thousands of children from parents entering the country illegally. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Defiant Homeland Security Secretary Defends Family Separations

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An artist's rendering shows the design of an "electric skate" vehicle that the Boring Company says could travel up to 150 mph and whisk passengers to and from Chicago's O'Hare Airport in minutes. The Boring Company hide caption

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The Boring Company

Anne Donovan became a championship coach in the WNBA after winning at the college and Olympic levels as a player. She's being mourned by fellow basketball greats, including Tamika Catchings and Dawn Staley. Jessica Hill/AP hide caption

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Jessica Hill/AP