Bill Chappell Bill Chappell is a writer and editor on the Newsdesk in the heart of NPR's newsroom in Washington, DC.
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Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell

Reporter, Producer

Bill Chappell is a writer and editor on the Newsdesk in the heart of NPR's newsroom in Washington, DC.

Chappell's work for NPR includes being the lead writer for online coverage of several Olympic Games, from London in 2012 and Rio in 2016 to Pyeongchang in 2018 – stints that also included posting numerous videos and photos to NPR's Instagram and other branded accounts. He has also previously been NPR.org's homepage editor.

Chappell established the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR's website; his assignments also include being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road. Chappell has coordinated special digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, in addition to editing the rundown of All Things Considered. He also frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as The Salt.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to tell compelling stories, promoting more collaboration between departments and desks.

Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that performed one of NPR's largest website redesigns. One year later, NPR.org won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

Prior to joining NPR, Chappell was part of the Assignment Desk at CNN International, working with reporters in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America. Chappell also edited and produced stories for CNN.com's features division, before moving on to edit video and produce stories for Sports Illustrated's website.

Early in his career, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants, and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

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The U.S. is lifting tariffs on Canadian and Mexican steel imports, nearly a year after imposing the duties. Here, a worker is seen at Bri-Steel Manufacturing, which makes seamless steel pipes, in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Candace Elliott/Reuters hide caption

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Candace Elliott/Reuters

The new U.S. tariffs list includes staples such as rice, along with clocks, watches and other items that weren't previously under threat of new duties. Here, farmers plant rice seeds at a seedlings pool in China's Jiangsu province. Xu Jingbai/VCG via Getty Images hide caption

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Xu Jingbai/VCG via Getty Images

U.S. Prepares Tariffs On Additional $300B Of Imported Chinese Goods

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Supreme Court Justices Neil Gorsuch (left) and Brett Kavanaugh wrote opposing opinions in a high-profile case involving Apple's App Store. The two Trump appointees are seen here at the Capitol in February. Doug Mills/Pool / Reuters hide caption

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Doug Mills/Pool / Reuters

State prosecutor Eva-Marie Persson announced Monday that Sweden is reopening its investigation of Julian Assange over rape allegations from 2010. Jonathan Nackstrand /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jonathan Nackstrand /AFP/Getty Images

U.S. stocks fell sharply Monday after China retaliated for President Trump's latest round of tariffs. Here, a trader works on the floor at the New York Stock Exchange as a TV shows the state of the market. Brendan McDermid/Reuters hide caption

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Brendan McDermid/Reuters

María Guadalupe González, seen here winning the Women's 20 km race at the IAAF World Race Walking Team Championships last May, has been banned from the sport for four years. Yifan Ding/Getty Images for IAAF hide caption

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Yifan Ding/Getty Images for IAAF

Chelsea Manning, a former military intelligence analyst, was freed after refusing to testify about WikiLeaks, but she now faces a new subpoena. Ford Fischer/News2Share/Reuters hide caption

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Ford Fischer/News2Share/Reuters

North Korea on Thursday fired projectiles that are believed to be missiles from the country's western area, South Korea's military says. The same day in Seoul, people watch a TV showing footage of a previous missile launch by North Korea. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

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Ahn Young-joon/AP

Students line up near STEM School Highlands Ranch during a shooting at the Colorado school that left one dead and eight injured on Tuesday. Shreya Nallapati via Reuters hide caption

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Shreya Nallapati via Reuters

North Korea returned 55 boxes of presumed U.S. remains last summer, following a summit between President Trump and North Korea's Kim Jong Un. But that effort has now stalled, along with relations between the two countries. Kat Wade/Getty Images hide caption

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Kat Wade/Getty Images