Bill Chappell Bill Chappell is a writer and editor on the News Desk in the heart of NPR's newsroom in Washington, DC.
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Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell

Reporter, Producer

Bill Chappell is a writer and editor on the News Desk in the heart of NPR's newsroom in Washington, D.C.

Chappell's work for NPR includes being the lead writer for online coverage of several Olympic Games, from London in 2012 and Rio in 2016 to Pyeongchang in 2018 – stints that also included posting numerous videos and photos to NPR's Instagram and other branded accounts. He has also previously been NPR.org's homepage editor.

Chappell established the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR's website; his assignments also include being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road. Chappell has coordinated special digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, in addition to editing the rundown of All Things Considered. He also frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as The Salt.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to tell compelling stories, promoting more collaboration between departments and desks.

Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that performed one of NPR's largest website redesigns. One year later, NPR.org won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

Prior to joining NPR, Chappell was part of the Assignment Desk at CNN International, working with reporters in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America. Chappell also edited and produced stories for CNN.com's features division, before moving on to edit video and produce stories for Sports Illustrated's website.

Early in his career, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants, and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

Story Archive

In this screenshot from a Facebook Live video of the church service by Maisey Cook, a woman takes the stage at New Life Christian Church and World Outreach in Warsaw, Ind. with her husband to tell her story of how Pastor John Lowe II had sex with her she was 16 years old. Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Screenshot by NPR

U.S. Attorney General Merrick Garland said that the Justice Department's new use of force policy reflects the consensus views of law enforcement leadership groups and union associations. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Pfizer will submit new data to the FDA this week about trials of its vaccine for kids younger than 5 years old. Here, a girl holds her sister's hand as a nurse prepares to administer the COVID-19 vaccine at a vaccination clinic in Los Angeles. Kids 5 and older have been eligible for the vaccine since last November. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

After a report alleged SpaceX paid a flight attendant to settle a sexual misconduct case against Elon Musk, the tech billionaire called it a politically motivated attack. Musk is seen here in March, at a new Tesla factory in Germany. Christian Marquardt/Getty Images hide caption

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Christian Marquardt/Getty Images

The 2020 model of the Hover-1 Superfly Hoverboard is being recalled after it was found to have a software issue that can make it move without the user intending it to. U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission hide caption

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U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission

Hundreds of people gather near a U.S. Air Force C-17 transport plane at the perimeter of the international airport in Kabul, Afghanistan, on Aug. 16, 2021. SIGAR, released its interim report Wednesday detailing why Afghanistan's government and military collapsed immediately after the U.S. withdrawal. Shekib Rahmani/AP hide caption

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Shekib Rahmani/AP

The U.S. deal with the Taliban destroyed Afghans' military morale, a new report says

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McDonald's arrived in Moscow when Russia was still part of the Soviet Union. Tens of thousands of customers stood in line when its first restaurant opened on Jan. 31, 1990, at Moscow's Pushkin Square. Vitaly Armand/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Vitaly Armand/AFP via Getty Images

People pray outside the scene of a shooting at a supermarket, in Buffalo, N.Y., on Sunday. A day earlier, a white 18-year-old killed 10 people and wounded three in what authorities described as "racially motivated violent extremism." Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

The names of the victims and messages of healing written in chalk at a makeshift memorial outside of the Tops supermarket in Buffalo, N.Y., on Sunday, one day after a gunman killed 10 people and injured 3 others. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Demonstrators gather on the steps to the State Capitol to speak against transgender-related legislation bills being considered in the Texas Senate and Texas House in May 2021 in Austin, Texas. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Elon Musk says he wants to see more details about the number of fake accounts on Twitter before his deal to buy the social media platform goes through. He's seen here last week, arriving for the 2022 Met Gala at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images

Elon Musk says he's put the blockbuster Twitter deal on pause over fake accounts

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