Bill Chappell Bill Chappell is a writer and editor who currently works on NPR's Newsdesk, in the heart of the newsroom. In the past, he has edited NPR's homepage and worked with Morning Edition and Fresh Air, among other shows.
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Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell

Reporter, Producer

Bill Chappell is a writer and editor on the Newsdesk, in the heart of NPR's newsroom in Washington, D.C.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to being the lead writer and editor for online coverage of several Olympic Games, from London 2012 to Pyeongchang 2018. His assignments have included being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as establishing the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR.org.

In the past, Chappell has edited and coordinated digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, in addition to editing the rundown of All Things Considered. He frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as All Tech Considered and The Salt.

In 2009, Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that redesigned NPR's web site. One year later, NPR.org won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to use digital tools to tell compelling stories, in addition to "evangelizing" — promoting more collaboration between legacy and digital departments.

Prior to joining NPR, Chappell was part of the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and coordinating CNN's pool coverage on major events.

Chappell's work for CNN included editing digital video and producing web stories for SI.com. He also edited and produced stories for CNN.com's features division.

Before joining CNN, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, Chappell attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

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Michael Cohen, President Donald Trump's former lawyer, says Trump directed him to arrange hush-money payments to two women during the closing weeks of the 2016 presidential campaign. Craig Ruttle/AP hide caption

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Craig Ruttle/AP

Central American migrants walk along the U.S. border fence looking for places to cross, in Tijuana, Mexico. Rebecca Blackwell/AP hide caption

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Rebecca Blackwell/AP

7-Year-Old Migrant Girl Dies Of Dehydration And Shock In U.S. Border Patrol Custody

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Cardinal George Pell, shown leaving court in Melbourne in May, was reportedly found guilty of sexual abuse, but Australian media are barred from reporting the news. Robert Cianflone/Getty Images hide caption

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Robert Cianflone/Getty Images

Apple already employs more people in Austin than it does in any other city outside of its California headquarters. The new campus will be near its existing facility in the North Austin area. Apple hide caption

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Apple

British Prime Minister Theresa May returns to No. 10 Downing St. after the no-confidence vote in London. May ultimately won that vote Wednesday and retained her leadership role in the Conservative Party. Leon Neal/Getty Images hide caption

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Theresa May Survives No-Confidence Vote Amid Battle Over Brexit

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Time magazine is printing four covers for its "Person of the Year" issue, featuring Jamal Khashoggi, top left, members of the Capital Gazette newspaper staff, top right, Wa Lone and Kyaw Soe Oo, bottom left, and Maria Ressa. Time Magazine/AP hide caption

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Time Magazine/AP

Researchers say they've found a way to let queen bees pass on immunity to a devastating disease called American foulbrood. The infectious disease is so deadly, many states and beekeeping groups recommend burning any hive that's been infected. Here, a frame from a normal hive is seen in a photo from 2017. Bernadett Szabo/Reuters hide caption

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Bernadett Szabo/Reuters

American priest Kenneth Hendricks is accused of abusing at least 10 young boys in the Philippines; U.S. officials who sought his arrest are now trying to learn if there are any victims in Ohio, where he was previously based. Bureau of Immigration (Philippines)/AP hide caption

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Bureau of Immigration (Philippines)/AP

California predicts mandatory solar panel installations will add nearly $10,000 to the upfront cost of a home — money that will be recouped through energy savings. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Cuba's telecom monopoly is rolling out broad Internet access for mobile phone users this week. Here, a woman uses her smartphone to surf the Internet in Havana. Desmond Boylan/AP hide caption

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Desmond Boylan/AP

Ohio State Buckeyes coach Urban Meyer is retiring, the school said on Tuesday. He's shown with his wife, Shelley Meyer, after defeating the Northwestern Wildcats in the Big Ten conference championship game at Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis. Brian Spurlock/USA Today Sports / Reuters hide caption

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Brian Spurlock/USA Today Sports / Reuters

An Israeli soldier, seen in September, stands near a wall along the Israel-Lebanon border near the Israeli region of Rosh Haniqra. The Israeli military says it has launched an operation intended to "expose and thwart" tunnels built on the border by the Hezbollah militant group. Sebastian Scheiner/AP hide caption

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Sebastian Scheiner/AP