Bill Chappell Bill Chappell is a writer and editor on the News Desk in the heart of NPR's newsroom in Washington, DC.
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Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell

Reporter, Producer

Bill Chappell is a writer and editor on the News Desk in the heart of NPR's newsroom in Washington, D.C.

Chappell's work for NPR includes being the lead writer for online coverage of several Olympic Games, from London in 2012 and Rio in 2016 to Pyeongchang in 2018 – stints that also included posting numerous videos and photos to NPR's Instagram and other branded accounts. He has also previously been NPR.org's homepage editor.

Chappell established the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR's website; his assignments also include being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road. Chappell has coordinated special digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, in addition to editing the rundown of All Things Considered. He also frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as The Salt.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to tell compelling stories, promoting more collaboration between departments and desks.

Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that performed one of NPR's largest website redesigns. One year later, NPR.org won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

Prior to joining NPR, Chappell was part of the Assignment Desk at CNN International, working with reporters in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America. Chappell also edited and produced stories for CNN.com's features division, before moving on to edit video and produce stories for Sports Illustrated's website.

Early in his career, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants, and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

Story Archive

"Our nation's lands and waters should be places to celebrate the outdoors and our shared cultural heritage — not to perpetuate the legacies of oppression," Secretary of the Interior Deb Haaland said as she ordered the word "squaw" to be removed from federal place names. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

A copy from the first printing of the U.S. Constitution sold for more than $43 million Thursday night — a world record for a historical document at auction, Sotheby's said. Yuki Iwamura/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Yuki Iwamura/AFP via Getty Images

The Rio Grande is seen from the International Bridge near a section of the U.S.-Mexico border where a father and daughter drowned attempting to cross into the United States in 2019, in Matamoros, Tamaulipas. Oscar Alberto Martinez and his 23-month-old daughter, Angie Valeria, had migrated from El Salvador and planned to seek political asylum in the U.S. when they died. Verónica G. Cárdenas/Getty Images hide caption

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Verónica G. Cárdenas/Getty Images

Travis McMichael testified in his murder trial in the Glynn County Courthouse in Brunswick, Ga. He, along with his father, Greg McMichael, and a neighbor, William "Roddie" Bryan, are charged in the February 2020 slaying of 25-year-old Ahmaud Arbery. Stephen B. Morton/Pool / Getty Images hide caption

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Stephen B. Morton/Pool / Getty Images

Travis McMichael told the court Wednesday that he wants to give his point of view about what happened on the day Ahmaud Arbery died in a neighborhood in the Brunswick, Ga., area. Stephen B. Morton/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephen B. Morton/Pool/Getty Images

Mexican painter Frida Kahlo's "Diego y yo" set a new auction record for art by a Latin American artist, selling for $34.9 million at Sotheby's on Tuesday night. Tolga Akmen/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Tolga Akmen/AFP via Getty Images

In this courtroom sketch, Ghislaine Maxwell looks over her shoulder to the courtroom audience prior to the start of jury selection in her trial on Nov. 16, 2021 in New York. Prospective jurors got their first glimpse of Maxwell, the British socialite charged with helping Jeffrey Epstein sexually abuse girls and women, when a judge began questioning them. Elizabeth Williams/AP hide caption

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Elizabeth Williams/AP

Pfizer's agreement with a U.N. group to let other companies produce its new antiviral pill as a generic drug is meeting with a mixed reaction. In late summer, protesters at Pfizer's world headquarters in New York urged the drugmaker to broadly share the patent for its COVID-19 vaccine. Bruce Gilbert/AP hide caption

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Bruce Gilbert/AP

Rev. Jesse Jackson, left, sits with Ahmaud Arbery's mother, Wanda Cooper-Jones, at the murder trial of Greg McMichael his son, Travis McMichael, and a neighbor, William "Roddie" Bryan, in the killing of Ahmaud Arbery in the Glynn County Courthouse. Stephen B. Morton/AP hide caption

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Stephen B. Morton/AP

The Trump International Hotel in Washington, D.C., will reportedly be renamed after a Miami-based investment group takes control of the property on Pennsylvania Avenue. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

One year after enduring an unprecedented backlog, the postal system is ready to handle mail and packages for the 2021 holiday season, Postmaster General Louis DeJoy said. Here, an employee loads a sorting robot during a media tour of a U.S. Postal Service package support annex in La Vergne, Tenn. Brett Carlsen/Getty Images hide caption

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Brett Carlsen/Getty Images

Teacher Keishia Thorpe said she was speechless after winning the Global Teacher Prize 2021 at the UNESCO headquarters in Paris. Thorpe teaches English to high school students whose families have immigrated to the U.S. Bertrand Guay/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Bertrand Guay/AFP via Getty Images

Britain has set new criteria to protect thousands of red public phone booths. Here, spectators sit on two of the kiosks as a crowd watches a parade of athletes who competed in the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games. AFP/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/AFP via Getty Images

NASA's ambitions for putting astronauts on the moon have been delayed. Here, newly minted astronauts from NASA and the Canadian Space Agency are seen last year. They're the first candidates to graduate under the Artemis program, and could be eligible for assignments including the Artemis missions to the Moon, International Space Station, and missions to Mars. Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images