Bill Chappell Bill Chappell is a writer and editor on the News Desk in the heart of NPR's newsroom in Washington, DC.
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Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell

Reporter, Producer

Bill Chappell is a writer and editor on the News Desk in the heart of NPR's newsroom in Washington, D.C.

Chappell's work for NPR includes being the lead writer for online coverage of several Olympic Games, from London in 2012 and Rio in 2016 to Pyeongchang in 2018 – stints that also included posting numerous videos and photos to NPR's Instagram and other branded accounts. He has also previously been NPR.org's homepage editor.

Chappell established the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR's website; his assignments also include being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road. Chappell has coordinated special digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, in addition to editing the rundown of All Things Considered. He also frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as The Salt.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to tell compelling stories, promoting more collaboration between departments and desks.

Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that performed one of NPR's largest website redesigns. One year later, NPR.org won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

Prior to joining NPR, Chappell was part of the Assignment Desk at CNN International, working with reporters in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America. Chappell also edited and produced stories for CNN.com's features division, before moving on to edit video and produce stories for Sports Illustrated's website.

Early in his career, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants, and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

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Los Angeles police say they have arrested five people in connection with the February shooting death of rapper Pop Smoke. The late musician is seen here during Paris Fashion Week's men's fall-winter shows in January. Claudio Lavenia/Getty Images hide caption

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Claudio Lavenia/Getty Images

World Health Organization Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus at a meeting last week at WHO headquarters in Geneva. Tedros says the coronavirus "thrives on division." Fabrice Coffrini/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Fabrice Coffrini/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

"People started screaming and shouting for them to let me go," says Vauhxx Booker, who says he was assaulted by a group of white men on July 4. Booker is seen here speaking at a community gathering against racism, where protesters demanded charges in his case. Jeremy Hogan/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Jeremy Hogan/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

'I Didn't Want To Be A Hashtag,' Says Black Man Who Feared Being Lynched In Indiana

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A passerby wears a mask out of concern for the coronavirus while walking past an American flag displayed in Boston on Tuesday. The U.S. has now recorded more than 3 million confirmed cases of the coronavirus. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

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The U.S. killed Iranian Maj. Gen. Qassem Soleimani in a targeted drone strike in Baghdad. A U.N. investigator says the action violated Iraq's sovereignty. Here, protesters in Tehran, Iran, hold up an image of Soleimani during a demonstration on Jan. 3. Ali Mohammadi/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Ali Mohammadi/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Ghislaine Maxwell has been arrested on charges that she helped Jeffrey Epstein recruit underage girls for sexual abuse. The two are seen here in 2005. Joe Schildhorn/Patrick McMullan via Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Schildhorn/Patrick McMullan via Getty Images

Tables are marked with X's for social distancing in the outdoor dining area of a restaurant in Los Angeles, Wednesday. California Gov. Gavin Newsom has ordered a three-week closure of bars and indoor operations of restaurants and certain other businesses in Los Angeles and 18 other counties as the state copes with increasing cases of COVID-19. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP

Protesters stand across from Seattle officers early Wednesday in a road in the Capitol Hill Organized Protest zone. Police started taking down demonstrators' tents in the protest zone after Seattle's mayor ordered it to be cleared. Aron Ranen/AP hide caption

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Aron Ranen/AP

A statue of Christopher Columbus was removed from in front of City Hall in Columbus, Ohio, on Wednesday. The statue has been a focal point for racial justice protests; earlier this week, demonstrators climbed onto its pedestal to pose for photos. Seth Herald/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Seth Herald/AFP via Getty Images

Officers in Aurora, Colo., face off with protesters over Elijah McClain's death outside police headquarters Saturday at the Aurora Municipal Center. The department says it's investigating photos that officers took at a memorial site for McClain, who died in police custody in 2019. Andy Cross/MediaNews Group/The Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Andy Cross/MediaNews Group/The Denver Post via Getty Images

People sit in a terrace bar at the beach in Spain earlier this month, when many internal travel restrictions were lifted. The EU has decided on its first list of approved travel partners, as part of its reopening of external borders. Joan Mateu/AP hide caption

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Joan Mateu/AP

Alexis McGill Johnson becomes the permanent president and CEO of Planned Parenthood after serving in the role on an interim basis. Here, she addresses a rally against white supremacy last year in Lafayette Square in Washington, D.C. Marlena Sloss/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Marlena Sloss/The Washington Post via Getty Images

The Indianapolis 500 — usually viewed by hundreds of thousands of spectators — will be run in August in front of a crowd capped at 50% capacity, track officials say. Here, cars race in front of fans during last year's event. Darron Cummings/AP hide caption

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Darron Cummings/AP