Bill Chappell Bill Chappell is a writer and editor on the Newsdesk in the heart of NPR's newsroom in Washington, DC.
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Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell

Reporter, Producer

Bill Chappell is a writer and editor on the Newsdesk in the heart of NPR's newsroom in Washington, DC.

Chappell's work for NPR includes being the lead writer for online coverage of several Olympic Games, from London in 2012 and Rio in 2016 to Pyeongchang in 2018 – stints that also included posting numerous videos and photos to NPR's Instagram and other branded accounts. He has also previously been NPR.org's homepage editor.

Chappell established the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR's website; his assignments also include being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road. Chappell has coordinated special digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, in addition to editing the rundown of All Things Considered. He also frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as The Salt.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to tell compelling stories, promoting more collaboration between departments and desks.

Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that performed one of NPR's largest website redesigns. One year later, NPR.org won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

Prior to joining NPR, Chappell was part of the Assignment Desk at CNN International, working with reporters in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America. Chappell also edited and produced stories for CNN.com's features division, before moving on to edit video and produce stories for Sports Illustrated's website.

Early in his career, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants, and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

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Simon Cheng, pictured in this poster, went missing on Aug. 9 after visiting the mainland China city of Shenzhen. The Hong Kong citizen and former staff member at the U.K. consulate says he was tortured while being held by Chinese police. Willy Kurniawan/Reuters hide caption

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Willy Kurniawan/Reuters

Former U.K. Consulate Staffer In Hong Kong Says He Was Tortured In Mainland China

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Deputy Director of Public Prosecution Eva-Marie Persson says "the evidential situation has been weakened to such an extent" that the inquiry into Julian Assange shouldn't continue. Jessica Gow /TT News Agency/Reuters hide caption

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Jessica Gow /TT News Agency/Reuters

Police arrest anti-government protesters at Hong Kong Polytechnic University on Monday. Pro-democracy protesters organized a general strike last week as demonstrations in Hong Kong stretched into their sixth month. Laurel Chor/Getty Images hide caption

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Laurel Chor/Getty Images

Hong Kong Protesters In Tense Standoff With Police At Polytechnic University Campus

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A woman and girl drop off flowers at a makeshift memorial in Central Park near Saugus High School in Santa Clarita, Calif., where a student shot five fellow teenagers Thursday. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Cleveland Browns defensive end Myles Garrett hits Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Mason Rudolph with his own helmet as offensive guard David DeCastro tries to intervene, in the final seconds of their game Thursday night. Ken Blaze/USA Today Sports / Reuters hide caption

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Ken Blaze/USA Today Sports / Reuters

A man embraces his daughter after picking her up at Central Park in Santa Clarita, Calif., after a shooting at Saugus High School on Thursday. At least two people died in the attack, according to local law enforcement. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Ken Cuccinelli had been considered President Trump's top choice to lead Homeland Security. Instead, he'll be the deputy to the new acting secretary, Chad Wolf. Roy Rochlin/Getty Images hide caption

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Roy Rochlin/Getty Images

Venice Mayor Luigi Brugnaro trudges through high water in St. Mark's Square on Wednesday, the result of an exceptionally high tide in the scenic Italian city. Manuel Silvestri/Reuters hide caption

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Manuel Silvestri/Reuters

Archbishop José Gomez, 67, was elected to lead the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops Tuesday. He's seen here blessing a dog with holy water during the annual Blessing of the Animals ceremony in Los Angeles last year. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Connecticut State Police Detective Barbara J. Mattson holds a Bushmaster AR-15-style rifle, the same type of gun used in the Sandy Hook shooting, during a 2013 hearing in Hartford, Conn. The gun-maker Remington is being sued by the families of the victims. Jessica Hill/AP hide caption

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Jessica Hill/AP

Former President Jimmy Carter had surgery Tuesday to relieve pressure on his brain. He's seen here earlier this month, teaching Sunday school at his church in Plains, Ga. John Amis/AP hide caption

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John Amis/AP

Jimmy Carter Surgery: 'No Complications' In Bid To Relieve Pressure On His Brain

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Nearly 30 years after its last documented sighting, a silver-backed chevrotain was spotted by a camera set up in the forest of southern Vietnam. Southern Institute of Ecology/Global Wildlife Conservation/Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research/NCNP hide caption

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Southern Institute of Ecology/Global Wildlife Conservation/Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research/NCNP

Mary Cain says she endured constant pressure to lose weight and was publicly shamed during her time at the Nike Oregon Project. She's seen here in the 1500-meter race at the 2014 USA Track and Field Championships. Cain won silver in that race; she had turned 18 just a month earlier. Christopher Morris /Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Christopher Morris /Corbis via Getty Images