Bill Chappell Bill Chappell is a writer and producer who currently works on NPR's Newsdesk, in the heart of the newroom. In the past, he has worked with Morning Edition, Fresh Air, and other shows.

Bill Chappell

Reporter, Producer

Bill Chappell is a writer and producer on the Newsdesk, in the heart of NPR's newsroom in Washington, D.C.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to being the lead writer and editor for online coverage of several Olympic Games, from London 2012 to Pyeongchang 2018. His assignments have included being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as establishing the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR.org.

In the past, Chappell has edited and coordinated digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, in addition to editing the rundown of All Things Considered. He frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as All Tech Considered and The Salt.

In 2009, Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that redesigned NPR's web site. One year later, NPR.org won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to use digital tools to tell compelling stories, in addition to "evangelizing" — promoting more collaboration between legacy and digital departments.

Prior to joining NPR, Chappell was part of the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and coordinating CNN's pool coverage on major events.

Chappell's work for CNN included editing digital video and producing web stories for SI.com. He also edited and produced stories for CNN.com's features division.

Before joining CNN, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, Chappell attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

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Former Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor says she has been diagnosed with "dementia, probably Alzheimer's disease." She's seen here in 2012. Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Listen to an extended version of Justice Sandra Day O'Connor's interview with NPR's Nina Totenberg

Only Available in Archive Formats.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo speaks to reporters at the State Department on Tuesday about penalties against Saudis suspected in the death of Jamal Khashoggi. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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State Department Announces Penalties In Response To Jamal Khashoggi Death

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The Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macau Bridge was lit up in Hong Kong on Monday, days before opening for public use. Called the world's longest cross-sea project, the bridge and tunnel extends for 34 miles. Kin Cheung/AP hide caption

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World War II Norwegian resistance fighter Joachim Roenneberg, seen here in 2013, has died at age 99. He led a team that was credited with slowing Hitler's plan to build atomic weapons. Andrew Winning/Reuters hide caption

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Scottish cyclist Jenny Graham stands at the Brandenburg Gate in Berlin after she circumnavigated the world by bicycle in just under 125 days. Christoph Soeder/picture alliance via Getty Image hide caption

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Mourners stand beside the grave of Gen. Abdul Raziq, the Kandahar police chief who was killed by a Taliban attack, during his burial ceremony Friday in Kandahar, Afghanistan. AP hide caption

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Afghanistan Delays Election In Kandahar After Attack That Killed Police Chief

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As head of the police in Kandahar, Lt. Gen. Abdul Raziq was credited with bringing more security to the southern Afghan city. Raziq died in an attack Thursday; he's seen here in a photo from 2015. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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"There are issues remaining around the backstop," Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May told reporters on Thursday, referring to the debate over how to treat Ireland and Northern Ireland when the U.K. leaves the EU. Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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As Brexit Deadlines Loom, May Says U.K. Considering A Longer Transition Period

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The cost of a pint of beer could rise sharply in the U.S. and other countries because of increased risks from heat and drought, according to a new study that looks at climate change's possible effects on barley crops. Peter Nicholls/Reuters hide caption

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A firefighter helps a youngster reach safety in a flooded street during a rescue operation following heavy rains that saw rivers bursting their banks in Trèbes, near Carcassonne, in southern France. Pascal Pavani/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Rescue personnel walk through debris in Mexico Beach, which was devastated by Hurricane Michael. Gerald Herbert/AP hide caption

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'This Is A War Zone': Hurricane Michael Leaves Deadly Trail Through Southeast

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Pope Francis has accepted the resignation of the archbishop of Washington, Cardinal Donald Wuerl. The two met in 2015 during the pope's visit to Washington, D.C. Gary Cameron/Reuters hide caption

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The move comes just more than two decades after the young gay man's brutal murder in Laramie, Wyo. His death became an important symbol in the fight against homophobia. Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images hide caption

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Rescue personnel search for people who may need help in Mexico Beach, Fla., on Thursday, one day after Hurricane Michael made landfall near the area. Gerald Herbert/AP hide caption

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Recovery Work Begins After Hurricane Michael Carves Through Florida Panhandle

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