Bill Chappell Bill Chappell is a writer and producer who currently works on NPR's Newsdesk, in the heart of the newroom. In the past, he has worked with Morning Edition, Fresh Air, and other shows.

Bill Chappell

Reporter, Producer

Bill Chappell is a writer and producer on the Newsdesk, in the heart of NPR's newsroom in Washington, D.C.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to being the lead writer and editor for online coverage of several Olympic Games, from London 2012 to Pyeongchang 2018. His assignments have included being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as establishing the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR.org.

In the past, Chappell has edited and coordinated digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, in addition to editing the rundown of All Things Considered. He frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as All Tech Considered and The Salt.

In 2009, Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that redesigned NPR's web site. One year later, NPR.org won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to use digital tools to tell compelling stories, in addition to "evangelizing" — promoting more collaboration between legacy and digital departments.

Prior to joining NPR, Chappell was part of the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and coordinating CNN's pool coverage on major events.

Chappell's work for CNN included editing digital video and producing web stories for SI.com. He also edited and produced stories for CNN.com's features division.

Before joining CNN, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, Chappell attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

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Rescue crews work at the scene of a bridge that collapsed Genoa, Italy, on Tuesday. Dozens of people are feared dead, after a large section of the Morandi Bridge, built in the 1960s, suddenly collapsed during a fierce rainstorm. Paolo Rattini/Getty Images hide caption

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Paolo Rattini/Getty Images

West Virginia House Speaker Pro Tempore John Overington presides over a hearing on articles of impeachment on Monday at the state Capitol in Charleston, W.Va. John Raby/AP hide caption

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John Raby/AP

West Virginia House Votes To Impeach All 4 State Supreme Court Justices

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Afghan volunteers carry an injured woman on a stretcher to a hospital in Ghazni province on Sunday. The Taliban assault on the city of Ghazni has resulted in intense gun battles and hundreds of casualties. Mohammad Anwar Danishyar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mohammad Anwar Danishyar/AFP/Getty Images

North Korea and South Korea will hold their third high-level summit in September. The meetings were agreed to at a meeting of South Korean Unification Minister Cho Myoung-Gyon, second from right, who shook hands with his North Korean counterpart Ri Son Gwon, second from left, after their meeting in Panmunjom. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

2 Koreas' Leaders Will Hold New Summit In Pyongyang Next Month

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A Pakistani recruit, 22, who was recently discharged from the U.S. Army, holds an American flag as he poses for a picture. The U.S. Army has stopped discharging immigrant recruits who enlisted seeking a path to citizenship, at least temporarily. Mike Knaak/AP hide caption

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Mike Knaak/AP

West Virginia's state Capitol, where the state's Supreme Court chambers are located. The state House Judiciary Committee has adopted articles of impeachment against all four justices on the state's Supreme Court of Appeals, accusing the judges of a range of crimes and throwing the court's immediate future into disarray. David Grant/Flickr hide caption

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David Grant/Flickr

An appeals court has ruled in favor of the family of José Antonio Elena Rodríguez, who was shot on the Mexican side of the border at Nogales by an American agent who was on the U.S. side of the border. Max Herman/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Max Herman/NurPhoto via Getty Images

In the past year, thousands of Ofo bicycles have popped up on the sidewalks of Dallas and other cities — but the company has recently been shrinking its operations. These bikes were photographed in Singapore last summer. Edgar Su/Reuters hide caption

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Edgar Su/Reuters

After data from the Strava fitness app was shown to depict U.S. personnel movements at military bases, the Pentagon is restricting the use of geolocation devices. Strava Heat Map; Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Strava Heat Map; Screenshot by NPR

Alex Jones and his Infowars channels have been removed from YouTube; Facebook and Apple's iTunes have also deleted most or all of his outlets on their services. He's seen here being escorted from a rally near the 2016 Republican National Convention. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call Inc./Getty Images hide caption

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Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call Inc./Getty Images

Pints of Guinness stouts are lined up at one of the outdoor bars at the new brewery. Guinness, famous for making stout beer, opened a new brewery in Maryland this week. It's the first time Guinness has had a brewery in the U.S. in more than 60 years. Emily Bogle/NPR hide caption

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Emily Bogle/NPR

Guinness Opens Its First U.S. Brewery In 64 Years

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