Bill Chappell Bill Chappell is a writer and editor on the News Desk in the heart of NPR's newsroom in Washington, DC.
Stories By

Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell

Reporter, Producer

Bill Chappell is a writer, reporter and editor, and a leader on NPR's flagship digital news team. He has frequently contributed to NPR's audio and social media platforms, including hosting dozens of live shows online.

He has gone to two Olympics for NPR (Rio and Pyeongchang), and has been the lead editor for several others. This work focused on finding the human aspect of the Games — and sharing that fascination through text, video and images on NPR's Instagram and other branded accounts.

Because of his contributions, Chappell is also named on NPR's Peabody-award winning team for its Ebola coverage. Years ago, he established the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps' presence on NPR.org.

At NPR, Chappell has trained digital and radio staff in how to tell compelling stories online, promoting more collaboration between departments and desks. He was previously NPR.org's homepage editor, and has worked with shows such as Morning Edition, Fresh Air, and All Things Considered.

Prior to NPR, Chappell was an editor on the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America. He also edited and produced stories for CNN.com's features division.

Story Archive

Tuesday

A woman was pronounced dead at the Water's Edge Rehab and Nursing Center in Port Jefferson, N.Y. — but hours later, workers at a funeral home discovered she was alive and breathing. Google Maps/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Google Maps/Screenshot by NPR

Rescue teams are conducting search and rescue operations in Diyarbakir and other parts of southeastern Turkey that were hit by powerful earthquakes on Monday. Anyone claiming to predict quakes, a seismologist tells NPR, is making "scattershot" predictions. Ilyas Akenigin/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ilyas Akenigin/AFP via Getty Images

Monday

Sunday

People look at a dead gray whale at Ocean Beach in San Francisco, Calif., in May 2019, a year when 122 gray whales died in the U.S., according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Last year, 47 of the whales died. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Friday

A high altitude balloon floats over Billings, Mont., on Wednesday. The U.S. is tracking a suspected Chinese surveillance balloon that has been spotted over U.S. airspace. Larry Mayer/AP hide caption

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Larry Mayer/AP

Wednesday

The lawyer for a leading accuser of R. Kelly says prosecutors shouldn't have dropped charges against Kelly before his appeals of federal criminal convictions were resolved. The singer is seen here in a courthouse in Chicago. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

Tom Brady says he's retiring from the NFL, and this time he means it. "I won't be long-winded," the quarterback said. "You only get one super-emotional retirement essay, and I used mine up last year." Julio Aguilar/Getty Images hide caption

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Julio Aguilar/Getty Images

Thursday

Asteroid 2023 BU will streak about 2,200 miles above the Earth's surface on Thursday night. Its path is seen here in an image from NASA's Scout impact hazard assessment system. The moon's path is in gray. NASA/JPL-Caltech hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech

Festival volunteer Erin Petrey pours nonalcoholic martinis during bartender Derek Brown's master class at the Mindful Drinking Fest in Washington, D.C., on Jan. 21. Keren Carrión/NPR hide caption

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Keren Carrión/NPR

This drinks festival doesn't have alcohol. That's why hundreds of people came

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Tuesday

The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists announced that it has moved the minute hand of the Doomsday Clock to 90 seconds to midnight. From left,, Siegfried Hecker, Daniel Holz, Sharon Squassoni, Mary Robinson and Elbegdorj Tsakhia with the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists remove a cloth covering the Doomsday Clock at a news conference at the National Press Club in Washington on Tuesday. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Mikaela Shiffrin seized first place in her first run in the giant slalom in Kronplatz, Italy, bidding to make history in the World Cup. Alain Grosclaude/Agence Zoom/Getty Images hide caption

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Alain Grosclaude/Agence Zoom/Getty Images

Monday

The murder trial of prominent South Carolina lawyer Alex Murdaugh is now under way, with Murdaugh facing a possible life sentence if he's found guilty of killing his wife and son. Grace Beahm Alford/AP hide caption

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Grace Beahm Alford/AP

Sunday

U.S. taxpayers are navigating several changes in this year's tax filing season, which runs from Jan. 23 to April 18. Here, the Internal Revenue Service building is seen in Washington, D.C. Zach Gibson/Getty Images hide caption

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Zach Gibson/Getty Images

Thursday

Prosecutors in Santa Fe, N.M., have announced involuntary manslaughter charges against Alec Baldwin in connection with the shooting death of cinematographer Halyna Hutchins in 2021. Mike Coppola/Getty Images for 2022 Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights Ripple of Hope Gala hide caption

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Mike Coppola/Getty Images for 2022 Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights Ripple of Hope Gala